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I declared an array:

char * words[1000] = {NULL};

And now I have a series of forked child processes adding words to that array, but they are not affecting the parent program. How can I change that?

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1  
FYI, you're first block of code can be simplified to char* words[1000] = {NULL}; and every item in the array will be set to NULL. –  Cornstalks Dec 6 '12 at 3:00
    
Please never write this again: words[i][strlen(words[i])] = '\0';. You already know how long the string is (from strlen(temp), put NUL at the right place. –  Michael Foukarakis Dec 6 '12 at 3:05
    
Hmm. That code looks correct to me: clear the array of pointers, then each time you want to put something, search from the beginning until you find a null-pointer, then occupy that place. So, maybe you run your init-code each time you put something? Or your words-array gets overwritten? Best would be you post your whole program. –  pbhd Dec 6 '12 at 3:05
    
"...because each day he gets farther away from the paint can.". You may want to think about keeping track of where the holes are in your table some way besides scanning. –  WhozCraig Dec 6 '12 at 3:06
1  
The child and parent processes have different address spaces, and you have to do extra work for them to be able to share memory. There are various was to do inter-process communication, shared memory likely being what you want. –  Cornstalks Dec 6 '12 at 6:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hmm, for your edit-case: Dont use fork, use threads, because then everything runs in one address-space...
And of course, then use mutexes to protect your words-array...

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School assignment. No choice. –  Aerovistae Dec 6 '12 at 3:17
    
Haha. Then words goes into shared memory. Some more work to do for you... –  pbhd Dec 6 '12 at 3:19

you have not added the if block inside the while block!!!

   while(i < 1000 && words[i] != NULL)
   {
   i++;
 if(i<1000){
    words[i] = (char*) malloc(strlen(temp)+1);
    strcpy(words[i], temp);
   words[i][strlen(words[i])] = '\0';
    printf("Added: %s at location %d\n", words[i], i);
   }
  }
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Oh, no, that's not it. The while loop you see here is not the while loop which runs this ten times. That if statement is not supposed to be inside the while loop. The while loop is supposed to find the next open slot in the array, and the if statement adds a word at that slot if i<1000, i.e. if the array isn't full. –  Aerovistae Dec 6 '12 at 2:59
    
Then you can post the whole code. –  Debobroto Das Dec 6 '12 at 3:00
    
I clarified it. –  Aerovistae Dec 6 '12 at 3:03

Try this you got the while braces wrong:

int i = 0;
while(i < 1000 && words[i] != NULL){
    i++;
    if(i<1000){
        words[i] = (char*) malloc(strlen(temp)+1);
        strcpy(words[i], temp);
        words[i][strlen(words[i])] = '\0';
        printf("Added: %s at location %d\n", words[i], i);
    }
}
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Please paste the whole code... I wrote code to do what I think you're doing and it worked for me...

    #include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  char* words[1000];
  int j;
  for(j = 0; j<1000; j++)
    words[j] = NULL;
  char *temp = "dummy";

  for (j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {
      int i = 0;
      while(i < 1000 && words[i] != NULL)
        i++;
      printf("Adding something to %d vs %d\n",i,j);
      if(i<1000){
        words[i] = (char*) malloc(strlen(temp)+1);
        strcpy(words[i], temp);
        words[i][strlen(words[i])] = '\0';
        printf("Added: %s at location %d\n", words[i], i);
      }
    }
}

/* prints:
Adding something to 0 vs 0
Added: dummy at location 0
Adding something to 1 vs 1
Added: dummy at location 1
Adding something to 2 vs 2
Added: dummy at location 2
Adding something to 3 vs 3
Added: dummy at location 3
Adding something to 4 vs 4
Added: dummy at location 4
Adding something to 5 vs 5
Added: dummy at location 5
Adding something to 6 vs 6
Added: dummy at location 6
Adding something to 7 vs 7
Added: dummy at location 7
Adding something to 8 vs 8
Added: dummy at location 8
Adding something to 9 vs 9
Added: dummy at location 9
*/
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This made me realize the problem lay elsewhere. I edited. –  Aerovistae Dec 6 '12 at 3:17
    
From your new edit, it sounds like you need to use shared memory. (Also, you might want to review, for example, stackoverflow.com/questions/7455161/… if you're not understanding WHY you're seeing the behavior you're seeing (assuming you're using fork and not some other approach) –  Foon Dec 6 '12 at 3:26
    
Oh, I do realize how it works. I'm just trying to verify that it's impossible to do what I'm trying to do. –  Aerovistae Dec 6 '12 at 3:26
    
Not that I expect it helps, but putting on my greybeard ... if you were running on VxWorks 5.4 and using whatever they provide that's fork like but not really, your code would be working fine (ish... there's still the issues of performance folks have pointed out)... but fork under Unix (and related) is going to make it so process A can't easily mess with its child / parent / cousin processes. Otherwise, Dining Philosophers would be stabbing each other with their chopsticks or something. –  Foon Dec 6 '12 at 3:34

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