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I have a set of objects, say "people", that have relationships with each other. I want to be able to get from one person to another, which will be another object in the array.

So I came up with this:

class Person
  attr_accessor :name, :parent, :collection
  def parents
    rtn = []
    pid = @parent
    while pid
      p = collection.select{|i|i.name == pid}.first
      if p 
        rtn << p
        pid = p.parent
      else
        pid = nil
      end
    end
    rtn
  end
  def to_s;@name;end
end
class PersonCollection < Array
  def <<(obj)
    obj.collection = self
    super
  end
end

...which allows me to do this:

p1 = Person.new
p1.name = 'Anna'
p2 = Person.new
p2.name = 'Bob'
p2.parent = 'Anna'
pc = PersonCollection.new
pc << p1
pc << p2
pp p2.parents   

Please excuse my rather clunky example. The key objective is having a way for a member of a collection to be able to access other members of the same collection. Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a linked-list to me, so you either need to forgo the array, or make an array of linked-lists, depending on your needs. – the Tin Man Dec 6 '12 at 15:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there a better way?

Yes. Make the objects hold a reference to their related objects:

class Person
  attr_accessor :name, :parent, :collection

  def parents
    if parent
      [parent].concat(parent.parents)
    else
      []
    end
  end

  def to_s
    name
  end
end

p1 = Person.new
p1.name = 'Anna'

p2 = Person.new
p2.name = 'Bob'
p2.parent = p1

p2.parents now returns [p1], with no array traversals, string comparisons, or PersonCollection.

share|improve this answer
    
In my real world problem, the parent object may not exist at the time the child is created. I might be able to fix that though.... – Rob Dec 6 '12 at 4:49
1  
@Rob So? In the example usage in the answer the parent isn't assigned till after the object is created. – Andrew Marshall Dec 6 '12 at 5:45
    
Point being that p1 exists when p2 is being created and filled. I don't have that. – Rob Dec 6 '12 at 5:55
1  
@Rob No, you're missing the point that it really doesn't have to: p2 = Person.new; p2.name = 'Bob'; p1 = Person.new; p1.name = 'Anna'; ... ; p2.parent = p1;. – Andrew Marshall Dec 6 '12 at 6:23
    
Yes of course. What I mean is, if you're inside a loop, reading and creating Person objects from a file, and throwing them into an array. You could scan the array at the end and find the parents and update the childs, etc, etc. Or build the lookup into the collection (as my solution did). And yes, there's pros and cons. You answer is a good one, and much appreciated. Just holding out for something amazinigly more applicable to my case (I may be disappointed). – Rob Dec 6 '12 at 23:04

Using a Hash would be a better way to go, to prevent all those array traversals. Here's my solution using a second hash to log and lookup your orphans:

class Person
  attr_accessor :name, :parent, :parent_key, :collection

  def parents
    if parent
      [parent].concat(parent.parents)
    else
      []
    end
  end

  def children
    self.collection.values.select{ |person| person.parent === self }
  end

  def descendants
    self.collection.values.select{ |person| person.parents.include? self }
  end

  def to_s
    self.name
  end
end

class PersonCollection < Hash
  attr_accessor :orphans

  def initialize
    self.orphans = Hash.new
    super
  end

  def store (key,obj)
    obj.collection = self
    if !obj.parent_key.nil?
        if self[obj.parent_key] 
            #this person's parent is already in the Hash
            obj.parent = self[obj.parent_key]
        else 
            #this person's parent is missing, so add this person to the orphans hash
            self.orphans[obj.parent_key] ||= []
            self.orphans[obj.parent_key] << obj
        end
    end
    if orphans[obj.name] 
        # this person has an array of orphans, so lets finally set their parents 
        self.orphans[obj.name].each do |orphan|
            orphan.parent = obj
        end

        # finally, clean up the hash after taking care of theses orphans
        self.orphans.delete(obj.name)
    end

    super
  end

end

To sum up my approach:

  1. If a person can find his/her parent when being added to the collection...bingo.
  2. If a person cannot find his/her parent when being added to the collection, his/her object is logged/stored in the hash self.orphans under his/her parent's name.
  3. If a person has orphans under his/her name when being added to the collection, those orphans are updated so they finally know their parent.
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