Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was trying to print the address of the pointer variable not the address where it is pointing to, could anyone assist me in achieving that? Below is what I am trying but it is showing warning which i am not able to resolve. Thanks!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int* y;
    printf("%p\n",y);
    printf("%x\n",&y);
    y = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
    printf("%p\n",y);
    printf("%x\n",&y);
    return 0;
}

Compilation warning:

Warning: format ‘%x’ expects argument of type ‘unsigned int’,
    but argument 2 has type ‘int **’ 

Output:
0xb773fff4
bfa3594c
0x8361008
bfa3594c
share|improve this question
2  
You took its address with & correctly -- the printf hints are just hints – Warren P Dec 6 '12 at 3:48
    
Both y and &y are pointer values. Why are you using %p to print one pointer value, but suddenly switch to %x for another pointer value? All of your printf statements are printing pointers, which means that all of them should use %p. – AnT Dec 6 '12 at 3:59
2  
Also, I find it hard to believe that the output you posted was produced by the code you posted. You posted either wrong code, or wrong output. – AnT Dec 6 '12 at 4:03
    
@AndreyT Sorry, you got it right I have to edit the output, I was trying too much with %x and %p to print the address of the pointer variable itself, and somewhere in between posted the code in hurry I am correcting it. Appreciate your assistance! – vbp Dec 6 '12 at 4:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your second printf() should take a "%p\n" format, and strictly a cast:

printf("%p\n", (void *)&y);

The number of machines where the cast actually changes anything is rather limited.

share|improve this answer
    
As a comment, %x is unsigned int, and for example on 64bit machines, this will not be same as %p. As Jonathan said, always %p for pointers – julumme Dec 6 '12 at 3:55
    
@Jonathan Thanks! It is working good :) – vbp Dec 6 '12 at 4:30
    
I'm glad AndreyT asked you about the output because the original output didn't make much sense. Unfortunately, I was helping my kids with homework at the same time and didn't get to raise the question. Be aware that the format for %p varies between platforms. If you want to control the pointer format (I usually do), then use <stdint.h> and printf("0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", (muintptr_t)&y);. This uses string concatenation and the macros defined in the header to format the address with at least 8 digits and with upper-case hex digits and the 0x prefix. Not all platforms add the 0x prefix. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 6 '12 at 4:40

The code seems to compile without warning or error on Visual Studio 2012.

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>

    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
        int* y = 0;
        printf("%p\n",y);
        printf("%x",&y);
        y = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
        printf("%p\n", y);
        printf("%x",  &y);

        return 0;
    }

The only recommendation is that you initialize y when you declare it.

share|improve this answer
    
I think your answer is a sign that Visual Studio is broken, not that the code is fine. Perhaps you need to turn on more warnings - the warning is valid! – dave Dec 6 '12 at 4:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.