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Got the following code

 protected virtual void InternalChange(DomainEvent @event)
 {
       ((dynamic) this).Apply(@event);
 }

child objects implement the logic to handle events via a number of fields eg

 protected Apply ( Message1 message)
 {

 }
protected Apply ( Message2 message)
 {

 }

however this gives an error saying its inaccessible. I tried virtual but no luck..

Any ideas ? .. hopefully without reflection like this method. ( eg http://blogs.msdn.com/b/davidebb/archive/2010/01/18/use-c-4-0-dynamic-to-drastically-simplify-your-private-reflection-code.aspx)

More information I can move the InternalChange to the child class but id rather not have the child doing the dispatch.

   void Apply(AggregateRootHandlerThatMeetsConventionEvent domainEvent)
    {
        OnAggregateRootPrivateHandlerThatMeetsConventionCalled = true;
    }


    void Apply(AggregateRootPrivateHandlerThatMeetsConventionEvent domainEvent)
    {
        OnAggregateRootPrivateHandlerThatMeetsConventionCalled = true;
    }

    void Apply(AggregateRootProtectedHandlerThatMeetsConventionEvent domainEvent)
    {
        OnAggregateRootProtectedHandlerThatMeetsConventionCalled = true;
    }


    protected override void InternalChange(DomainEvent @event)
    {

        Apply(((dynamic)@event));
    }

Edit for now i'm using this in the child ( and made the parent abstract) which works but its ugly id rather implementers not worry about the dispatch .

    protected void Handle(DomainEvent message)
    {
        Handle ( (dynamic) message);
    }
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2 Answers 2

You should define your base class to have either abstract or virtual on the method signature, for instance.

protected abstract void Apply(Message1 message);

Use virtual if you want to define an implementation in your base class that doesn't have to (but can) be overridden in the child class.

In your subclass, you would override it as such:

protected override void Apply(Message1 message)
{
    // code here
}

Also, in your example, the method InternalChange is trying to call Apply with an argument of type DomainEvent, however, in both your overloads for Apply, they accept either type of Message1 or Message2. If it did compile, you would get a run time error anyway because the .NET dynamic run time would not be able to find an appropriate method that matches the argument.

As for using dynamic, I think it is unnecessary for the problem at hand.

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Message1 and Message2 are of type DomainEvent thats the tricky part i need run time casting/overloading via dynamic... and thats also why i cant put the abstract method in the base class as i dont know the parameters implementers will use . –  user1496062 Dec 6 '12 at 6:09
    
If Message1 and Message2 inherit from DomainEvent, you cannot upcast that direction implictly. I'd recommend you use the keyword as to determine the actual type that gets sent to InternalChange. –  Matthew Dec 6 '12 at 14:26
    
But the code doesnt know the concrete type it comes from an event source DB... Sure i could make a case statement or use reflection but is there a better way ? –  user1496062 Dec 7 '12 at 2:57

The logic is sort of... reversed. I don't understand one or two things: what class is calling apply, the base type or the child type? How the discerning of the child class to send the event to happens? Couldn't you render Apply virtual protected and leave it empty in the base class?

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