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I want to read all file names form a particular directory and then create new files with those names by appending some string to them in another directory.

e.g > 'A', 'B', 'C' are in 'logs' directory then script should create 'A_tmp', 'B_tmp', 'C_tmp' in 'tmp' directory

what i am using is -

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $( find `echo $logDir` -type f )
 do
      name=eval basename $file
      echo $name
      name=$(echo $name | sed 's/.$//')
      echo $tempDir
      opFile=$tempDir$name
      echo $opFile
 done

But what I understood is, $file is containing '\n' as last character and I am unable to concatenate the string.

right now I am not creating files, just printing all the names.

So, how I can remove the '\n' from the file name, and is my understanding correct ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Analysis

There are multiple issues to address in your script. Let's take it step by step:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $( find `echo $logDir` -type f )

This scheme assumes no spaces in the file names (which is not an unusual restriction; avoiding problems with spaces in names is relatively tricky). Also, there's no need for the echo; just write:

for file in $(find "$logDir" -type f)

Continuing:

do
    name=eval basename $file

This runs the basename command with the environment variable name set to the value eval and the argument $file. What you need here is:

    name=$(basename "$file")

where the double quotes aren't strictly necessary because the name can't contain spaces (but it's not a bad habit to get into to quote all file names because sometimes the names do contain spaces).

    echo $name

This would echo a blank line because name was not set.

    name=$(echo $name | sed 's/.$//')

If name was set, this would chop off the last character, but if the name was A, you'd have nothing left.

    echo $tempDir
    opFile=$tempDir$name
    echo $opFile
done

Give or take double quotes and the fact that you've not added the _tmp suffix to opFile, there's nothing wrong with the rest.

Synthesis

Putting the changes together, you end up with:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $(find "$logDir" -type f)
do
    name=$(basename "$file")
    echo "$name"                    # Debug only
    echo "$tempDir"                 # Debug only
    opFile="$tempDir${name}_tmp"
    echo "$opFile"
done

That shows all the intermediate results. You could perfectly well compress that down to:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $(find "$logDir" -type f)
do
    opFile="$tempDir"$(basename "$file")"_tmp"
    echo "$opFile"
done

Or, using a simpler combination of double quotes because the names contain no spaces:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $(find "$logDir" -type f)
do
    opFile="$tempDir$(basename $file)_tmp"
    echo "$opFile"
done

The echo is there as a surrogate for the copy or move operation you plan to execute, of course.

EDIT: ...and to remove restrictions on file names containing spaces and globbing characters, do it as:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

find "$logDir" -type f |
while IFS= read -r file
do
    opFile="${tempDir}${file##*/}_tmp"
    echo "$opFile"
done

It will still fail for file names containing newlines. If you want to handle that then investigate a solution using find ... -print0 | xargs -0 or find ... -exec.

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I cant even comment here, Thanx a ton for this description ! Helped a lot ! thank you for your precious time. –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 5:36
    
some more help req - when i execute sed 's/.*-> \([^(]*\).*\( .*\):\([0-9]*$\)/function \1\ncalled from \2\nat line number \3\n/' inputFileName > outputFileName on command line, it executes fine but when i try same thing from shell script it throws an error - Syntax error: "(" unexpected can u please suggest anything here ? –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 5:37
    
Got the answer, i was using EVAL in shell script for execution sed commnad, now removed that, its working now. I will check exact use of eval in script now. –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 5:47
1  
I have a few scripts that use eval (26 that I've written and am still using out of hundreds — 322 shell scripts in my bin directory); it is a last resort and dangerous weapon. You should assume that eval is the wrong answer until you are sure you know why it's the correct answer, and are aware of the risks entailed in using it. If the users supply the input, the risk is non-negligible. And working out how the eval of a sed script replete with regular expression metacharacters will work is the sort of thing sadistic teachers set for finals exams; not the sort of thing you do for fun. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 6 '12 at 5:56
    
@JonathanLeffler++ eval should be pronouced "evil". –  cdarke Dec 6 '12 at 7:59
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Try the following.

#!/bin/sh

tmpDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

# list all files in log directory, pipe into a loop that reads each path line
# by line..
# Also note that there is no newline in this case since it is swallowed by 'read'.
find $logDir -type f | while read path; do
    # get the basename of the path
    name=`basename $path`
    # copy the found file to the temporary directory.
    dest="$tmpDir/${name}_tmp"
    echo $dest
done

Shell scripts have the ability to concatenate strings easily in statements, as demonstrated with $tmpDir/${name}_tmp, there is no need for replacing the output since read swallows any newlines.

find ... while read is a very useful construct when you want to read multiple lines of anything, it even works for files.

while read line; do
    echo $line
done < filename.txt

Edit: clarified

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Yeah, thanx for the good explanation in the answer, will try it without sed now ! –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 4:55
    
One thing, as I am using "cp" commnad, it will copy those files with sifferent name, but I dnt want to perform this creation of files, I am interested in names_tmp only, so for that purpose I have to use "tr" !.. right ? –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 5:01
    
Basically just echo instead of cp then, there is no newline in this case since 'read' swallows it. –  udoprog Dec 6 '12 at 5:03
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Try something like this:

tempDir=./tmp/
logDir=./logs/

for file in $( find `echo $logDir` -type f )
  do
    name=`eval basename $file|tr -d "\n"`_tmp
    echo $name
  done
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, sir !!!! it is working !..thank you. –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 4:54
    
You don't need the eval or the tr; you could use: name="$tempDir$(basename $file)_tmp". –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 6 '12 at 5:23
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If you change

name=eval basename $file

to

name=`eval basename $file`

then afterwads name contains what you want.

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I tried this, but was unable to get new file name as required. –  Pranav Dec 6 '12 at 4:53
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