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Given an input string such as " word1 word2 word3 word4 ", what would be the best approach to split this as an array of strings in Go? Note that there can be any number of spaces or unicode-spacing characters between each word.

In Java I would just use someString.trim().split("\\s+").

(Note: possible duplicate Split string using regular expression in Go doesn't give any good quality answer. Please provide an actual example, not just a link to the regexp or strings packages reference.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 41 down vote accepted

The strings package has a Fields method.

someString := "one    two   three four "

words := strings.Fields(someString)

fmt.Println(words, len(words)) // [one two three four] 4

DEMO: http://play.golang.org/p/et97S90cIH

From the docs:

func Fields(s string) []string

Fields splits the string s around each instance of one or more consecutive white space characters, returning an array of substrings of s or an empty list if s contains only white space.

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1  
Thanks a lot, I overlooked that method. –  ralfoide Dec 7 '12 at 6:55
    
You're welcome. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 7 '12 at 14:53

I came up with the following, but that seems a bit too verbose:

import "regexp"
r := regexp.MustCompile("[^\\s]+")
r.FindAllString("  word1   word2 word3   word4  ", -1)

which will evaluate to:

[]string{"word1", "word2", "word3", "word4"}

Is there a more compact or more idiomatic expression?

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If you're using tip: regexp.Split

func (re *Regexp) Split(s string, n int) []string

Split slices s into substrings separated by the expression and returns a slice of the substrings between those expression matches.

The slice returned by this method consists of all the substrings of s not contained in the slice returned by FindAllString. When called on an expression that contains no metacharacters, it is equivalent to strings.SplitN.

Example:

s := regexp.MustCompile("a*").Split("abaabaccadaaae", 5)
// s: ["", "b", "b", "c", "cadaaae"]

The count determines the number of substrings to return:

n > 0: at most n substrings; the last substring will be the unsplit remainder.
n == 0: the result is nil (zero substrings)
n < 0: all substrings
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1  
this seems like an overkill –  tomwilde Dec 6 '12 at 9:14
    
@Tom But it's still interesting even if it's not the best answer here. I upvoted this answer because I learned something. –  dystroy Dec 6 '12 at 18:24

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