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**Yes this is an exercise from "Building Java Programs", but its not an assigned problem.

Ladies/Gents -

I need to write a method that reads the following text as input:

hello how how are you you you you  
I I I am Jack's Jack's smirking smirking smirking smirking smirking revenge  
bow wow wow yippee yippee yo yippee yippee yay yay yay  
one fish two fish red fish blue fish  
It's the Muppet Show, wakka wakka wakka  

And produces the following as output:

how*2 you*4
I*3 Jack's*2 smirking*4
wow*2 yippee*2 yippee*2 yay*3

wakka*3

Now I know I have to use Scanner objects to first read a line into a String, the to tokenize the string. What I don't get is how I read a token into a string, then immediately compare it to the next token.

CONSTRAINT -> This is from the chapter before arrays so I'd like to solve without using one.

Here is the code I have so far:

public class Exercises {

public static void main(String[] Args) throws FileNotFoundException {

  Scanner inputFile = new Scanner(new File("misc/duplicateLines.txt"));
  printDuplicates(inputFile);

}

public static void printDuplicates(Scanner input){

  while(input.hasNextLine()){

        //read each line of input into new String
        String lineOfWords = input.nextLine();
        //feed String into new scanner object to parse based on tokens
        Scanner newInput = new Scanner(lineOfWords);

        while(newInput.hasNext()){

            //read next token into String
            String firstWord = newInput.next();

            //some code to compare one token to another


        }
    }
}
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1  
so what is your question? –  Bhavik Shah Dec 6 '12 at 6:02
    
How do I "remember" and compare between a "firstWord" and "secondWord" IOT create the output posted above. –  Pat K Dec 6 '12 at 6:27
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No need to use arrays...you just need a little bit of state in the while loop:

public class Exercises {

    public static void main(String[] Args) throws FileNotFoundException {

      // scanner splits on all whitespace characters by default, so it needs
      // to be configured with a different regex in order to preserve newlines
      Scanner inputFile = new Scanner(new File("misc/duplicateLines.txt"))
          .useDelimiter("[ \\t]");

      printDuplicates(inputFile);
    }

    public static void printDuplicates(Scanner input){

        int lastWordCount = 0;
        String lastWord = null;

        while(newInput.hasNext()){

            //read next token into String
            String nextWord = newInput.next();

            // reset counters on change and print out if count > 1
            if(!nextWord.equals(lastWord)) {
                if(lastWordCount > 1) {
                    System.out.println(lastWord + "*" + lastWordCount);
                }
                lastWordCount = 0;
            }

            lastWord = nextWord;
            lastWordCount++;
        }

        // print out last word if it was repeated
        if(lastWordCount > 1) {
            System.out.println(lastWord + "*" + lastWordCount);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't quite work. Creates a separate line for each duplicate and misses some: how*2 I*3 Jack's*2 smirking*5 wow*2 yippee*2 yippee*2 –  Pat K Dec 6 '12 at 6:16
    
@PatK by default, the Scanner breaks on any whitespace. which whitespace do you hope to retain? just newlines and carriage returns? –  stevevls Dec 6 '12 at 6:19
    
Yep need the newlines. Thats why in my initial try I read an entire line first into a String, then tokenized that String into a second Scanner object. I appreciate you checking this out @stevevls. Output definitely needs to look exactly as describe in OP. –  Pat K Dec 6 '12 at 6:23
    
@PatK you'll want to have a look at two methods: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/…, which can configure the scanner to split on a given pattern. and docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… because i would be remiss in giving you a solution that treats a space and tab as "whitespace other than CR and LF". ;) –  stevevls Dec 6 '12 at 6:34
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How about this? I'm allocating an extra string to keep track of the previous word.

while(input.hasNextLine()){

    //read each line of input into new String
    String lineOfWords = input.nextLine();
    //feed String into new scanner object to parse based on tokens
    Scanner newInput = new Scanner(lineOfWords);

    String previousWord = "";
    String currentWord = "";
    while(newInput.hasNext()){

        //read next token into String
        previousWord = currentWord;
        currentWord = newInput.next();

        if (currentWord.equals(previousWord)) {
            // duplicate detected!
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Only detects a duplicate, but doesn't track state if say, 3 of the same token occur on one line. I could be missing something. –  Pat K Dec 6 '12 at 7:02
    
@PatK True, I did not attempt to solve the entire puzzle, I only answered what he explicitly asked for, which was how to compare two words returned in sequence by the scanner. The answer to that question: use two variables. :-) I was hoping with that he could piece together the rest. –  The111 Dec 6 '12 at 7:05
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public class test2 {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    Scanner input = null;
    try {
      input = new Scanner(new File("chinese.txt"));
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {

      e.printStackTrace();
    }

    String currentLine;
    String lastWord="";
    String currentWord="";
    int count=1;
    while (input.hasNextLine()){
       currentLine=input.nextLine();
       Scanner newInput = new Scanner (currentLine);
       //System.out.println(currentLine);
       while(newInput.hasNext()){

         currentWord=newInput.next();
         if (!currentWord.equals(lastWord)&& count>1){
           System.out.print(lastWord+"*"+count+" ");
           count=1;


         }
         else if (currentWord.equals(lastWord)){
           count++;

         }
         lastWord=currentWord;

       }
       if (count>1){
         System.out.print(lastWord+"*"+count+" ");


       }
       System.out.println();
       count=1;

    }

    input.close();

    }

}
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