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Been struggling with this simple selector problem a couple of hours now and must be missing something obvious. I have a <ul> in which some <li>s have nested <ul>s. Each <li> contains a link and when this is clicked I want to execute a function (rather than navigate), but importantly, this should only happen for the links contained in the parent <ul> and not any links that may be present in a nested <ul>. Simple you'd think:

HTML:

<ul>
    <li>
        <a href="dontleavethis.page">A link</a>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="navigate.there">A nested link</a></li>
            <li><a href="navigate.somewhere">Another nested link</a></li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

jQuery:

$('li:has(ul) a').click(function() { 
    bla bla bla...
    return false;
});

Thing is, no matter how I phrase my selector, I cannot stop the links in the nested <ul> from triggering the click handler. They clearly do not match the ":has(ul)" criteria of the selector but the handler still gets attached for some reason. What am I doing wrong here?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
$('li:has(ul) > a').click(...)

Your problem is that $('li:has(ul) a') means all a elements inside the li that has the ul, not only immediate children.

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Ah, that makes perfect sense! Thanks! –  John Schulze Sep 3 '09 at 14:43
$('ul > li:has(ul) > a').click(function(){
    bla bla bla....
    return false;
});
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Sorry, no dice. I get exactly the same behaviour from this. But thanks anyway! –  John Schulze Sep 3 '09 at 14:41
    
Um, this is exactly the same thing as the answer you accepted... only it has the ul in there too (which won't change anything). –  idrumgood Sep 3 '09 at 18:43

If you give the top level links a class you can access them directly, without the need for any complex(ish) selector logic.

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this means that for every link a class is inserted, which clutters the html and generates unnessecary bandwidth. just giving the parent a class/id and selecting only direct ancestors is a lot more efficient –  Stephan Muller Sep 3 '09 at 14:41
    
true but the other selectors being offered are reliant on the DOM structure remaining consistent, which can cause trouble moving forward. classes can also offer a descriptive selector, making the code more readable. –  daddywoodland Sep 3 '09 at 14:53

You should give the main ul an id, I'll use "main" but you should try and think of a more descriptive one (for your own benefit). Then you can just use

$('ul#main > li > a').click(function() { 
    bla bla bla...
    return false;
});

The > will select only the direct ancestor of an element.

-edit- never mind, this also means the li's without an ul in it will have the style. @idrumgood's solution is best.

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Yep, that will work of course. Was hoping there was a neat way to do it without having to assign an ID or class (the parent element of the list already has an ID). –  John Schulze Sep 3 '09 at 14:47

could it be that the event is propagated?

how about

$('ul > li:has(ul) > a').click(function(event){
  bla bla bla....
  event.stopPropagation();
  return false;
});
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