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In my sample code, I'm trying to replace any words in 'text' that match with either 'redact' or 'redact_again'. Since it's an either/or scenario, I thought || would be used. It turns out that && actually works. If both or either one match, it replaces them with the word "Redacted" properly. If it doesn't find a match, it just reprints the 'text' as it should. I just want to understand why using || doesn't work in an either/or scenario?

puts "Tell me a sentence"
text = gets.chomp.downcase
puts "Redact this word: "
redact = gets.chomp.downcase
puts "And redact another word: "
redact_another = gets.chomp.downcase

words = text.split(" ")
words.each do |x|
 if x != redact && x != redact_another
 print x + " "
 else
 print "REDACTED "
 end
end
share|improve this question
    
Do you have an apple or an orange....no i don't have an apple AND I don't have an orange. – Kubee Dec 6 '12 at 6:21
    
never understod why people uses negations when affirmations can be used – user904990 Dec 6 '12 at 6:27
1  
Replace any words ... with either ... or ... is better replaced by a positive if == || == as in Salil's answer. In the ordinary speech we often say "if I have not this OR not that", and it is a common mistake to translate it by if ... OR .... But in computer language it must be translated by "not this AND not that", because what we actually mean is "if I have not (this or that)" => if not (a || b) or if not a && not b – BernardK Dec 6 '12 at 8:47
    
Replace any words ... with either ... or ... is better replaced by a positive if == || == as in Salil's answer. In the ordinary speech we often say "if I have not this OR not that", and it is a common mistake to translate it by if ... OR .... But in computer language it must be translated by "if not this AND not that", because what we actually mean is "if I have not (this or that)" => if not (a || b). We should say "if I have neither this nor that" => if not a && not b. As you can see in thecamel's answer, the negation of ORing two positive terms is equivalent to ANDing two negated terms. – BernardK Dec 6 '12 at 10:46
    
Thanks, guys. I think I understand. It's a problem I was working through at Codecademy. I'm a rookie (obviously), so please forgive the immaturity of my question. :) – bw_qa Dec 6 '12 at 14:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's a boolean condtion that causes this to happen.

Boolean values are either a 0 or 1.

  • When && is used BOTH variables must be 1 to be true.
  • When || is used EITHER variables must be 1 to be true.

Inverting the logic implies that the following two statements are logically correct:

(x == redact || x == redact_another) == (if x != redact && x != redact_another)

Nifty.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I understand that using && requires both to be true. The confusing part was why does it work if 'redact' finds a match but 'redact_another' does not. I get it now. Thanks for your answer! – bw_qa Dec 6 '12 at 14:39
    
Another link to relevant material: DeMorgan's Laws – obfk Dec 7 '12 at 2:38

Following should work

 if x == redact || x == redact_another
   print "REDACTED "
 else
   print x + " "
 end

OR

 print [redact, redact_another].include?(x) ? "REDACTED " : x + " "
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for showing me how to do it differently, but I was trying to understand why my sample worked differently than I expected it to. Seeing different ways of doing the same thing did help explain things. Thanks! – bw_qa Dec 6 '12 at 19:00

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