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Imagine that I have a shared folder MyShared:

User A, gets the file \MyShared:\Foo.txt after every 30 seconds.

And I overwrite \MyShared:\Foo.txt also after every 28 seconds (within my PowerShell script)

How can I prevent myself to overwrite this file while the user is getting it, in PowerShell? (I do not want to break the content of the file or end-up with some error by attempting to overwrite it in the time of user retrieving it)

If I rephrase the question: How can I force a Powershell script to wait overwriting a file until another process is finished reading it?

share|improve this question
    
Would it be acceptable to have the reading process just rename the file prior to working with it, and delete the copy when it has finished reading it? – Goyuix Dec 6 '12 at 15:49

In some cases, you may not be able to overwrite it if the file is open.

Otherwise, you will have to devise some other mechanism to signal that the reader has finished reading it. This is not really related to powershell. For example, the reader can create a "lock file" to notify the writer that the file is being read, which it deletes after completing the read. The powershell script can delete the file if the lock file does not exist.

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Basically the user will just copy it from the shared folder to another location. But I want to be sure that I do not overwrite it at the moment of his retrieval. – pencilCake Dec 6 '12 at 6:47
    
There are many such questions on so, it is pretty much impossible to do this is in a guaranteed way without additional protocol – Miserable Variable Dec 6 '12 at 6:57

I use this function to test if file il locked, but in file txt opened by notepad for example the file isn't locked:

function Test-FileLock {

  param (
        [parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [string]$Path
    )

  $oFile = New-Object System.IO.FileInfo $Path    
  if ((Test-Path -Path $Path) -eq $false)
  {
    $false
    return
  }      
  try
  {
      $oStream = $oFile.Open([System.IO.FileMode]::Open, [System.IO.FileAccess]::ReadWrite, [System.IO.FileShare]::None)
      if ($oStream)
      {
        $oStream.Close()
      }
      $false
  }
  catch
  {
    # file is locked by a process.
    $true
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what if the user has not opened it but just COPYing it from the shared location, and if I attempt to overwrite it? – pencilCake Dec 6 '12 at 6:49
    
Maybe a stupid question for a PS master but.. Why not 'return $false' but '$false return' ? – pencilCake Dec 6 '12 at 6:51
1  
@pencilCake Was useless. Removed ;) – CB. Dec 6 '12 at 6:58
1  
@pencilCake I'm just a master of puppets ;) – CB. Dec 6 '12 at 7:56
1  
@pencilCake You can write it as return $false but in powershell scripts and functions returning always anything that is write to default output. That's why $false alone: is the output of the function; return alone is the ..exit from the function... maybe is not the best design pattern.. but I like it :) – CB. Dec 6 '12 at 8:37

You can use the static Open method in the System.IO.File class. If you try open a file and it is being used by another process it will throw an exception, if you wrap it in a try/catch block, you will be able to tell if an exception has been thrown and therefore return $true in the catch block which will mean its in use.

function Get-FileStatus([string]$Path)
{
     try
     {
        [System.IO.File]::Open($Path, [System.IO.FileMode]::Open, [System.IO.FileAccess]::ReadWrite, [System.IO.FileShare]::None)
        return $false
     }
     catch
     {
        return $true
     }
}



if((Get-FileStatus -Path "C:\myfile.bin"))
{
   Write-Host "File in Use"
}
else
{
   Write-Host "File Not in Use"
}
share|improve this answer
    
How can I test this? – pencilCake Dec 6 '12 at 14:01
    
updated to show you how you could use it – user1462199 Dec 6 '12 at 14:48

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