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I have a simple CSS3 question regarding to selecting appropriate child node.

Here is a snippet of current HTML element structure:

<nav>
    <ul>
        <li>
            <a href="#"><div class="adminNavButton"><p>Pages</p></div></a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Make a new page</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Manage pages</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Delete pages</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
and more .... </ul> </nav>

In CSS3, I'm trying to select just <a href="#"><div class="adminNavButton"><p>Pages</p></div></a> using

nav ul li a{
}

However, it selects every children anchor tags including ones under <ul><li>. Do I have to give it a class selector to solve the issue? i.e.

<nav>
    <ul>
        <li>
            <a class="something" href="#"><div class="adminNavButton"><p>Pages</p></div></a>

If you know a technique that works across all browsers, I would appreciate it if you could share it with me.

Thanks in advance,

================================= Thanks for all your comments guys, :first-child nor :nth-child(1) didn't work from my main project so I've created a new project and tested the method. But it did not work So here is HTML structure and CSS3.

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>

<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>asf</title>
    <style>
        ul li a:first-child{
            color: red;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <ul>
        <li>
            <a href="">asf</a>
            <div>
                <a href="">asf</a>
            </div>
        </li>
        <li>
            <a href="">asfd</a>
            <div>
                <a href="">asf</a>
            </div>
        </li>
        <li>
            <a href="">asf</a>
            <div>
                <a href="">asf</a>
            </div>
        </li>
    </ul>
</body>


</html>

hmm heh =/ (p.s. I've tested it on Firefox and Chrome browser but didn't work)

share|improve this question
    
You can adress the first child, something like :nav ul li a:first –  eric.itzhak Dec 6 '12 at 7:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the first-child Pseudo-class:

nav > ul > li > a:first-child
{

}

Another option that will do what you want is the > selector:

nav > ul > li > a
{

}

The above will only apply to the Pages anchor. The > is the child selector so the element must be a direct child, unlike when using a space which targets all descendants. If you have siblings of Pages then those siblings would also be targeted whereas the first example wouldn't.

jsFiddle demo

From the W3C docs:

The :first-child pseudo-class represents an element that is the first child of some other element. Same as :nth-child(1).

share|improve this answer
    
:first-child doesn't actually make a difference here because every a is the first child of its li. The only thing that matters here is the child selector >. –  BoltClock Dec 6 '12 at 7:41
    
Awesome mate, this one worked! =) –  EnglishMaster Dec 6 '12 at 7:45
    
@BoltClock first-child matters if you have siblings of Pages and only want to select the first instead of all siblings. As I said in my second example, that will work if you want to target the siblings as well. –  MrCode Dec 6 '12 at 7:53
    
Like I said, it doesn't matter here because it's the only sibling that's an a. –  BoltClock Dec 6 '12 at 7:54
    
@BoltClock yes, you're absolutely right :) –  MrCode Dec 6 '12 at 8:28

This should do the trick:

nav ul li a:first-child{
}

You can also use a class, but if the structure will remain the same (in the first position) the example above is the best route.

share|improve this answer
    
:first is not a CSS selector. –  BoltClock Dec 6 '12 at 7:39
    
@BoltClock Thanks, fixed. –  Paul Dessert Dec 6 '12 at 7:41

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