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void removeDuplicateWithHashtable(LinkedListElement<char> *head)
{
    LinkedListElement<char> *runner = head;
    LinkedListElement<char> *previous = nullptr;
    hash_map<char, bool> record;
    while (runner) {
        if (record.count(runner->Data) == 0) {
            pair<char, bool> item(runner->Data,true);
            record.insert(item);
        }else
        {
            free(runner);
            previous->Next = runner->Next;
        }
        previous=runner;
        runner=runner->Next;
    }
}

Initially I thought there would be an error. Because in free(runner), if i free the memory, i can not access runner->Next. But GCC compiler ran successfully.

Actually if i change free to delete runner, it is also correct. can i ask the reason may be free or delete just tell you the memory is available no actually clear data inside, so you can also access Next. And can i ask how to improve it?

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Such logical errors cannot be detected by a compiler! Instead, the program has undefined behavior, which can include running seemingly OK, crashing, or producing all sorts of garbage. There are a lot of (and I can't stress that enough, like, a LOT) situations that result in undefined behavior

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1  
"cannot be detected" - in general: yes. in this case: certainly doable. – Karoly Horvath Dec 6 '12 at 9:30
    
@KarolyHorvath - That's what Lint is for... – Eli Iser Dec 6 '12 at 11:26
    
Actually if i change free to delete runner, it is also correct. can i ask the reason may be free or delete just tell you the memory is available no actually clear data inside, so you can also access Next. And can i ask how to improve it? – Hypnoz Dec 6 '12 at 17:20

It is not a compilation error but the problem (undefined behaviour) will manifest itself at runtime. If you choose to call free on unallocated memory the compiler will not stop you.

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Actually if i change free to delete runner, it is also correct. can i ask the reason may be free or delete just tell you the memory is available no actually clear data inside, so you can also access Next. And can i ask how to improve it? – Hypnoz Dec 6 '12 at 17:19
    
@Hypnoz It is not a question of delete or free - it will not be a compiler error either way. The simple fact is you should not attempt to release unallocated memory. – mathematician1975 Dec 6 '12 at 18:03

Your program can work fine since free() only marks some memory as free, but it does not actually overwrite it. Owing to this, the chances are your solution will run correctly most of the time as in your function you are not using any new memory. (At least in single threaded environment.)

On the other hand, I would go and fundamentally change the function like this:

template<typename _Tp>
void unique(forward_list<_Tp>& list)
{
  unordered_map<_Tp, bool> record;
  auto la=list.before_begin();
  for(auto it=list.begin(); it!=list.end(); ++it) 
  {
    if(record.find(*it)==record.end())
      record[*++la] = true;
    else
      list.erase_after(la);
  }
}

You can even go as far as writing this:

template<typename _Tp>
void unique(forward_list<_Tp>& list)
{
  unordered_map<_Tp, bool> record;
  auto la=list.before_begin();
  for(auto e: list) 
  {
    if(record.find(e)==record.end())
      record[*++la] = true;
    else
      list.erase_after(la);
  }
}

But I think that can be a bit too much, as it does not reflect that we need to go one element after an other.


My reasons for the fundamental change:

  1. In C++ free() is called delete. It is used in pair with new (which is used in c++ instead of malloc() or calloc()). delete is used like this:

    delete runner;
    // and new is used like this:
    Some_type *p = new Some_type();

  2. STL has already a LinkedList, so it makes sense to use that. It is called std::forward_list. You want to use erease_after, with a nice example.

  3. You want to use std::unsorted_map instead of hash_map (again, since it is in STL). The best is always the std solution.

  4. One of the main purpose of classes is to hide away necessary pointer activity, so in function headers I would rather use references instead of pointers, so at least your function should be

    void removeDuplicateWithHashtable(LinkedListElement& head)

share|improve this answer
    
"we use references instead of pointers" - To be fair, use of pointers is perfectly valid C++. – mathematician1975 Dec 6 '12 at 10:25
    
I disagree. Pointers can be avoided all the time in non-library code, since we have shared_ptr and unique_ptr. I hope you like my sample codes ;) – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 6 '12 at 10:35
    
Also, using pointers in function headers is pretty confusing: you don't know whether you need to call delete on a pointer afterwards... – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 6 '12 at 10:44
    
@BarnabasSzabolcs There are lots of cases in C++ where pointers are necessary. Any time you're implementing a dynamic structure, for example. Or anytime you need to navigate between objects. Having a reference member also means that an object can't be assignable. – James Kanze Dec 6 '12 at 11:04
    
Yeah, of course, there are situations where pointers are unavoidable, but that does rarely include function headers and most of the time one is better off using shared_ptr rather than a raw ptr. But you also avoid pointers when it is possible, don't you? Also, most of the dynamic structures can be built using some stl as fundamental pieces. (All the others I consider library building, really...) I try and correct my answer taking your opinion into consideration. – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 6 '12 at 11:20

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