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I am doing a bubble sort exercise and my feeling is that it is very close to correct. As it is at the moment I am presented with an eternal loop.

Where does the fault lie ?

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] numbers = { 2, 4, 8, 5, 88, 55, 32, 55, 47, 8, 99, 120, 4, 32 };
        int temporary;
        bool sorted;
        do
        {
            sorted = false;

            for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                int a = numbers[i];
                int b = numbers[i + 1];
                if (a > b)
                {
                    temporary = a;
                    a = b;
                    b = temporary;

                    sorted = true;

                }
            }
            Console.WriteLine("sorted");
        } while (sorted == true);


        foreach (int i in numbers)
        {
            Console.Write(i + " ");
        }

    }
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@Killercam I think that the question states this is a race condition. –  Jodrell Dec 6 '12 at 9:20
    
Cool. Apologies to all... :'[ –  Killercam Dec 6 '12 at 9:22
    
Your loop ALLWAYS runs with each iteration 1 to many times (and that stack). With each iteration you need to decrease end condition by 1. So you should write variable (that have numbers.length) and in condition write i< 'variable'--. Also, you arent SAVING results in array –  Gustav Klimt Dec 6 '12 at 9:25
    
possible duplicate of What's the most elegant way to bubble-sort in C#? –  Jodrell Dec 6 '12 at 9:25
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A better approach in C# is to use a generic bubble sort

public void BubbleSort<T>(IList<T> list);
{
    BubbleSort<T>(list, Comparer<T>.Default);
}

public void BubbleSortImproved<T>(IList<T> list, IComparer<T> comparer)
{
    bool stillGoing = true;
    int k = 0;
    while (stillGoing)
    {
        stillGoing = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count - 1 - k; i++)
        {
            T x = list[i];
            T y = list[i + 1];
            if (comparer.Compare(x, y) > 0)
            {
                list[i] = y;
                list[i + 1] = x;
                stillGoing = true;
            }
        }
        k++;
    }
}

A brief explanation of this algorithm is given by Jon Skeet in his answer here. "It uses an arbitrary comparer, but lets you omit it in which case the default comparer is used for the relevant type. It will sort any (non-readonly) implementation of IList, which includes arrays."

I hope this helps.

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1  
my answer but sooner, +1 –  Jodrell Dec 6 '12 at 9:23
2  
+1 for generics, BUT! algoritham is wasting time going over 'end' objects that are allready sorted. Bubble is called 'bubble' coz he pushes allways biggest number to most right end. So no need to check it over and over for every iteration. Store 'Length' into variable, and -- it in the condition. –  Gustav Klimt Dec 6 '12 at 10:45
1  
Please check this improved version of Jon Skeet's algorithm. –  Alex Filipovici Dec 6 '12 at 11:23
    
Cool. Edited. Thanks for your time. –  Killercam Dec 6 '12 at 11:27
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You exchange a with b but you DON'T do anything to your input array. Thus, you are constantly exchanging values in memory but the original array is not changed. Try:

            for ( int i = 0; i < numbers.Length - 1; i++ )
            {
                if ( numbers[i] > numbers[i + 1] )
                {
                    temporary = numbers[i];
                    numbers[i] = numbers[i + 1];
                    numbers[i + 1] = temporary;

                    sorted = true;

                }
            }
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You are not writing the results back onto the array.

Use this instead:

//temporary = a;
//a = b;
//b = temporary;

numbers[i] = b;
numbers[i + 1] = a;
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And if I may add, check out the difference between a Value type and a Reference type. –  raymond Dec 6 '12 at 9:25
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It should be

if (numbers[i] > numbers[i + 1])
    {
            temporary = numbers[i];
            numbers[i] = numbers[i + 1];
            numbers[i + 1] = temporary;

            sorted = true;

     }

changes made in a,b doesn't reflect in numbers[i] numbers[i+1] because a and b are mere copy of numbers[i] numbers[i+1]..

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Here is an working example:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int[] numbers = { 2, 4, 8, 5, 88, 55, 32, 55, 47, 8, 99, 120, 4, 32 };
    int temporary;
    bool sorted;

    do
    {
        sorted = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if (numbers[i] > numbers[i + 1])
            {

                temporary = numbers[i];
                numbers[i] = numbers[i + 1];
                numbers[i + 1] = temporary;

                sorted = true;
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("sorted");
    } while (sorted == true);

    foreach (int i in numbers)
    {
        Console.Write(i + " ");
    }
}
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