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I'm about to delete certain elements in an XML document, using code like the following:

NodeList nodes = ...;
for (int i = 0; i < nodes.getLength(); i++) {
  Element e = (Element)nodes.item(i);
  if (certain criteria involving Element e) {
    e.getParentNode().removeChild(e);
  }
}

Will this interfere with proper traversal of the NodeList? Any other caveats with this approach? If this is totally wrong, what's the proper way to do it?

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So, given that removing nodes while traversing the NodeList will cause the NodeList to be updated to reflect the new reality, I assume that my indices will become invalid and this will not work.

So, it seems the solution is to keep track of the elements to delete during the traversal, and delete them all afterward, once the NodeList is no longer used.

NodeList nodes = ...;
Set<Element> targetElements = new HashSet<Element>();
for (int i = 0; i < nodes.getLength(); i++) {
  Element e = (Element)nodes.item(i);
  if (certain criteria involving Element e) {
    targetElements.add(e);
  }
}
for (Element e: targetElements) {
  e.getParentNode().removeChild(e);
}
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1  
Why do you feel the need to do this? Do your criteria depend on the element's siblings? If yes (in other words, if-and-only-if you need to preserve the siblings) then keep a List (there's no need for Set, there aren't going to be duplicates). – kdgregory Sep 4 '09 at 11:57
    
Criteria doesn't depend on the siblings, but if I understand the answer above, if I delete node 5 out of 7, suddenly I'll only have 6 nodes in my NodeList, and my for loop will have wrong indices, skipping one Node and then advancing past the end of the list. Please correct me if I'm misunderstanding. – skiphoppy Sep 4 '09 at 14:02
1  
The order in which I remove the nodes doesn't matter, does it? – skiphoppy Sep 4 '09 at 14:48
1  
OK, I see what you're saying now. Count backwards. – kdgregory Sep 4 '09 at 15:34
1  
Ah, I see! So I just need to change the for loop to for (int i = nodes.getLength() - 1; i >= 0; i--) , and then I won't need the collection? Makes perfect sense. Post it, re-explaining why the original doesn't work, and I'll mark you as the accepted answer. :) – skiphoppy Sep 4 '09 at 17:58

According to the DOM specificaion, the result of a call to node.getElementsByTagName("...") is supposed to be "live", that is, any modification made to the DOM tree will be reflected in the NodeList object. Well, for conforming implementations, that is...

NodeList and NamedNodeMap objects in the DOM are live; that is, changes to the underlying document structure are reflected in all relevant NodeList and NamedNodeMap objects.

(DOM Specification)

So, when you modify the tree structure, a conforming implementation will change the NodeList to reflect these changes.

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2  
So that would mean my indexes become invalid during the traversal, right? – skiphoppy Sep 3 '09 at 15:52
    
@Dirk, appart from referencing the important information regarding DOM NodeList specs and Java's implementation of it... this answer doesn't offer a conclusive statement in regards to the question.. – Brett Caswell Sep 3 '15 at 20:06

Removing nodes while looping will cause undesirable results, e.g. either missed or duplicated results. This isn't even an issue with synchronization and thread safety, but if the nodes are modified by the loop itself. Most of Java's Iterator's will throw a ConcurrentModificationException in such a case, something that NodeList does not account for.

It can be fixed by decrementing NodeList size and by decrementing iteraror pointer at the same time. This solution can be used only if we proceed one remove action for each loop iteration.

NodeList nodes = ...;
for (int i = nodes.getLength() - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
  Element e = (Element)nodes.item(i);
   if (certain criteria involving Element e) {
    e.getParentNode().removeChild(e);
  }
}
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The Practical XML library now contains NodeListIterator, which wraps a NodeList and provides full Iterator support (this seemed like a better choice than posting the code that we discussed in the comments). If you don't want to use the full library, feel free to copy that one class: http://practicalxml.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/practicalxml/trunk/src/main/java/net/sf/practicalxml/util/NodeListIterator.java?revision=125&view=markup

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According to the DOM Level 3 Core specification,

the result of a call to method node.getElementsByTagName("...") will be a reference to a "live" NodeList type.

NodeList and NamedNodeMap objects in the DOM are live; that is, changes to the underlying document structure are reflected in all relevant NodeList and NamedNodeMap objects. ... changes are automatically reflected in the NodeList, without further action on the user's part.

1.1.1 The DOM Structure Model, para. 2

JavaSE 7 conforms to the DOM Level 3 specification: it implements the live NodeList interface and defines it as a type; it defines and exposes getElementsByTagName method on Interface Element, which returns the live NodeList type.


References

W3C - Document Object Model (DOM) Level 3 Core Specification - getElementsByTagName

JavaSE 7 - Interface Element

JavaSE 7 - NodeList Type

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