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I am unsure why these two blocks of code give different outputs:

unsigned int seed1 = 0;
char state1[256];
initstate(seed1, state1, 256);
printf("%10ld\n", random());
printf("%10ld\n", random());
// Gives:
// 1216130483
// 1950449197

vs.

unsigned int seed1 = 0;
char state1[256];
initstate(seed1, state1, 256);
printf("%10ld\n", random());
setstate(state1);
printf("%10ld\n", random());
// Gives:
// 1216130483
// 625602885

Am I misunderstanding what setstate() does?

EDIT: Interestingly enough, look at what this gives:

unsigned int seed1 = 0;
char state1[256];
initstate(seed1, state1, 256);
printf("%10ld\n", random());
setstate(state1);
setstate(state1);
printf("%10ld\n", random());
// Gives:
// 1216130483
// 1950449197
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1  
C only has rand and srand and neither random, initstate or setstate. Please tag your question with your OS. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 6 '12 at 10:28
1  
@JensGustedt I added the bsd tag. –  unwind Dec 6 '12 at 10:38
    
Running this example on Debian (stable) using gcc (Debian 4.4.5-8) 4.4.5 I get the same two numbers for all three code snippts. –  alk Dec 6 '12 at 12:43
    
so it looks like this is a bug/incorrect implementation then –  David Lawson Dec 7 '12 at 7:37
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1 Answer

I guess the call to initstate() doesn't also switch to that state, but the call to setstate() does, which is why the latter random() call returns a number generated from the new state.

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2  
Having experimented with the code a little, I don't think this is the case. Adding a call to setstate() right after initstate() makes no difference whatsoever. –  NPE Dec 6 '12 at 10:19
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