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Does an open-ended interval implementation exist for Java?

im new to JAVA and i would like to know what is the best data structure and how can i search through that data structure for my case: I have int intervals eg: 10-100, 200-500, 1000-5000 and for each interval i have a value 1, 2, 3, 4. I would like to know how can i save all those intervals and their values in a data structure and how can i search through that data structure to return the value for the specific interval. Eg. if i search 15, that is in interval 10-100, i would like to return 1.

Thank you

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marked as duplicate by Simon Lee, Bill the Lizard Dec 6 '12 at 13:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
No, they wont. And the values for the interval may not be consecutive either, so getting the keys for those interval wont help. –  Ionut Bogdan Dec 6 '12 at 11:18
    
Using an algorithm is not enough? –  ollins Dec 6 '12 at 11:21
    
These values/intervals change. Sometimes i have more intervals sometimes less. –  Ionut Bogdan Dec 6 '12 at 11:24
    
Tree? i think B-Tree is the answer. –  namxee Dec 6 '12 at 11:28
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use this approach:

import static org.hamcrest.core.Is.is;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;

import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class IntervalsTest {


    @Test
    public void shouldReturn1() {
        Intervals intervals = new Intervals();

        intervals.add(1, 10, 100);
        intervals.add(2, 200, 500);

        int result = intervals.findInterval(15);

        assertThat(result, is(1));

    }

    @Test
    public void shouldReturn2() {
        Intervals intervals = new Intervals();

        intervals.add(1, 10, 100);
        intervals.add(2, 200, 500);

        int result = intervals.findInterval(201);

        assertThat(result, is(2));

    }
}

class Range {

    private final int value;

    private final int lowerBound;

    private final int upperBound;


    Range(int value, int lowerBound, int upperBound) {
        this.value = value;
        this.lowerBound = lowerBound;
        this.upperBound = upperBound;
    }

    boolean includes(int givenValue) {
        return givenValue >= lowerBound && givenValue <= upperBound;

    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }
}

class Intervals {

    public List<Range> ranges = new ArrayList<Range>();

    void add(int value, int lowerBound, int upperBound) {
        add(new Range(value, lowerBound, upperBound));
    }

    void add(Range range) {
        this.ranges.add(range);
    }

    int findInterval(int givenValue) {
        for (Range range : ranges) {
            if(range.includes(givenValue)){
                return range.getValue();
            }
        }

        return 0; // nothing found // or exception
    }
}
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1  
Exactly what i was looking for. Thank you! –  Ionut Bogdan Dec 6 '12 at 11:44
    
+1 for almost mirror of my solution :-) –  Pawel Solarski Dec 6 '12 at 11:56
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If your intervals are mutually exclusive, a sorted map (java.util.TreeMap) using a comparator on the last member of the interval, and using firstKey on a tailMap on the searched item should work fine.

If the intervals may overlap, you need a segment tree (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Segment_tree), of which there's no implementation in the standard library.

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Your question is not entirely clear, particularly what you mean by the values 1, 2, 3, 4. But if you want a data structure that holds the limits of an interval, and checks if a number is within them, then make one! Like this:

public class Interval {
    int low;
    int high;

    public Interval(int low, int high) {
        this.low = low;
        this.high = high;
    }

    public boolean intervalContains(int value) {
        return ((value >= low) && (value <= high));
    }
}

And use it:

Interval theInterval = new Interval(10,100);
System.out.print(theInterval.contains(15)); // prints "true"
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This is not going to help because i dont know in which interval to search because i will have x intervals. By those values i mean that each interval has a "value" for eg. 10-100 has 1$ , 200-500 has 2$ if it makes sense? –  Ionut Bogdan Dec 6 '12 at 11:36
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Use hashmap (fast, more memory) or List (slower, little memory). I provide you both solutions below:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

class Interval {

    private int begin;
    private int end;
    // 1, 2, 3, 4
    private int value;

    public Interval(int begin, int end, int value) {
        this.begin = begin;
        this.end = end;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int getBegin() {
        return begin;
    }

    public void setBegin(int begin) {
        this.begin = begin;
    }

    public int getEnd() {
        return end;
    }

    public void setEnd(int end) {
        this.end = end;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public boolean contains(int number) {
        return (number > begin - 1) && (number < end + 1);
    }
}

public class IntervalSearch {

    // more memory consuming struct, fastest
    Map<Integer, Interval> intervalMap = new HashMap<Integer, Interval>();

    // less memory consuming, little slower
    List<Interval> intervalList = new ArrayList<Interval>();

    private boolean fastMethod = true;

    public IntervalSearch(boolean useFastMethod) {
        this.fastMethod = useFastMethod;
    }

    public Integer search(int number) {
        return fastMethod ? searchFast(number) : searchSlow(number);
    }

    private Integer searchFast(int number) {
        return intervalMap.get(number).getValue();
    }

    private Integer searchSlow(int number) {
        for (Interval ivl : intervalList) {
            if (ivl.contains(number)) {
                return ivl.getValue();
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void addInterval(Integer begin, Integer end, Integer value) {
        Interval newIvl = new Interval(begin, end, value);
        if (fastMethod) {
            addIntervalToMap(newIvl);
        } else {
            addIntervalToList(newIvl);
        }
    }

    private void addIntervalToList(Interval newIvl) {
        intervalList.add(newIvl);
    }

    private void addIntervalToMap(Interval newIvl) {
        for (int i = newIvl.getBegin(); i < newIvl.getEnd() + 1; i++) {
            intervalMap.put(i, newIvl);
        }
    }

    public boolean isFastMethod() {
        return fastMethod;
    }
}
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Use TreeMap, which is NavigableMap (Java 6 or higher).

Suppose you have entries key->value (10->1, 100->1, 200->2, 500->2, 1000->3, 5000->3)

floorEntry(15) will return 10->1

ceilingEntry(15) will return 100->1

With this you can determine the interval number of 15, which is 1. You can also determine if a number is between intervals.

Edit: added example

    TreeMap<Integer, Integer> map = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    map.put(10, 1);
    map.put(100, 1);
    map.put(200, 2);
    map.put(500, 2);
    map.put(1000, 3);
    map.put(5000, 3);
    int lookingFor = 15;
    int groupBelow = map.floorEntry(lookingFor).getValue();
    int groupAbove = map.ceilingEntry(lookingFor).getValue();
    if (groupBelow == groupAbove) {
        System.out.println("Number " + lookingFor + " is in group " + groupBelow);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Number " + lookingFor + 
                " is between groups " + groupBelow + " and " + groupAbove);
    }
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Obviously doesn't work if intervals overlap –  U Mad Dec 6 '12 at 12:24
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