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I'm currently brushing up my Java and reading up on Generics. Since they were not treated extensively in my Java class, I'm still having some trouble wrapping my mind about it, so please keep that in mind when answering.

First of all, I'm pretty sure that what I'm trying to is not possible. However, I'd like to find out where my thinking is wrong and how I should go about achieving what I want.

What I'm trying to do is manipulating an object that implements a generic interface from another class that has no knowledge about the instantiated type. Thus, I have something like the following classes:

public interface CalledInterface<E> {
    public E get() { ... }
    public set(E e) { ... }
}


public class Called implements CalledInterface<String> {
    ...
}

Now what I want to do is:

public class Caller {
    protected CalledInterface<?> c;

    public Caller (CalledInterface<?> arg) {
        c = arg;
    }

    public void run(){
        // I can do this:
        c.set(c.get());

        // But I'd want to be able to do something like:
        <?> element = c.get();
        c.set(element);
    }
}

What is the fundamental flaw in my thinking, if there is one? And what approach should I rather be taking?

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1  
c.get() returns a String, it is known in compile time... –  Aviram Segal Dec 6 '12 at 12:10
    
Why not make Caller generic as well? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 6 '12 at 12:10
    
This is really a non-question. Called is not generic but rather known to have get/set String methods –  Bohemian Dec 6 '12 at 12:14
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels That means I would have to specify the same generic type argument for Caller as for its argument in the constructor. It feels like this should not need to be necessary. Bohemian, I made a mistake in my question. I do not want Caller to be aware that it is using Called, but only CalledInterface, which is generic. –  Vincent Dec 6 '12 at 12:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After your edit:

    // I can do this:
    c.set(c.get());

No you can't. It won't compile with c being CalledInterface<?>. (Have you even tried it?)

To do this, you can use a "capture helper":

private static <T> void helper(CalledInterface<T> c) {
    c.set(c.get());
}
public void run(){
    helper(c);
}

Which also solves your second problem:

private static <T> void helper(CalledInterface<T> c) {
    T element = c.get();
    c.set(element);
}
public void run(){
    helper(c);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I had not tried the specific code example since I construed it for the sake of asking this question to abstract away all the irrelevant parts of my code. I recalled it working, but that was probably at a time when I had indeed captured the wildcard. Since the code doesn't work, I couldn't really test it, so sorry for that. As for the capture helper: that would be a solution, but it does not allow me to set the result of get() to a field in Caller, right? I tried to avoid the XY problem but seem to have fallen into the trap anyway... –  Vincent Dec 7 '12 at 12:34
    
@Vincent: you could make the helper non-static; that will allow you to set stuff in Caller –  newacct Dec 7 '12 at 18:24
    
Yes but then that field would need to have a type, which can't be generic, because I later need to pass the value of that field on to e.g. set(). –  Vincent Dec 7 '12 at 19:35
    
@Vincent: if you want to store a field of type E in Caller, then you will have to make Caller generic, parameterized on E, and c will need to be of type CalledInterface<E>. That's the only way you can guarantee that the type of the field you store matches the type parameter of CalledInterface. Otherwise it can't be safe. –  newacct Dec 7 '12 at 21:53
    
Ah, that makes sense. Too bad I have to define the type of E twice, but I see now why the compiler can't figure it out for itself. Thanks! –  Vincent Dec 10 '12 at 11:00

First of all, keep in mind that generics is a compile time thing not a runtime.

Now in your Caller you defined Called c. Called is defined to implement CalledInterface<String>, so automatically, Called has the following methods generated at compile time:

String get();
void set(String e); //i assume you wanted to return void

So essentially this doesn't really make sense:

<?> element = c.get();

The Caller class isn't even aware Called is using generics internally, for it, Called just deals with strings.

UPDATE

Based on your comment, since you don't want Caller to use Called directly but use CalledInterface first thing you have to do is change the type of c to that. In this case you should not use generics, because the whole point of generics is that the same class is used in different scenarios with different types (again determined at compile time), enforcing types without having repeated code.

If I understand correctly you don't want to restrict Caller to use String, so what you have to do is change CalledInterface to not use generics, and change the methods to:

Object get();
void set(Object o);

This is how we used to do things before Generics in Java 1.4. You obviously run the risk of not having type safety, so think through whether what you want really makes design sense, because it probably does not because you have to do instanceof anyway to check the type to use the Object in a useful way (i.e. to access its methods).

If on the other hand you just change the c member (and the constructor argument of Caller) to:

CalledInterface<String> c;

Your Caller will be interacting with the CalledInterface rather than the implementation and at the same time still be type safe. So you can still pass an instance of Called and set it to c.

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1  
+1 for restating that generics is a compile time thing not a runtime –  anubhava Dec 6 '12 at 12:10
    
I'm sorry, I made a mistake in my question. My intention was for Caller to not even be aware of its using Called, but only of CalledInterface. However, it should also not need to be aware of the generic type argument of CalledInterface, that should just be defined by the argument passed in the constructor. I have now amended the question. –  Vincent Dec 6 '12 at 12:34
    
The reason I use generics is because I want the same Interface in different scenarios with different types. Thus, there could also be a Called2 that implements CalledInterface but works on, say, integers. I want the interface to restrict implementing classes to returning the same argument with get() as they accept with set(). So this is not possible by using Object as the type, and it's also not an option to restrict CalledInterface to Strings as Called2 should be able to operate on e.g. integers. Hopefully this better explains the flaw in my thinking. –  Vincent Dec 7 '12 at 11:06
    
Generics is designed to do exactly that, allowing the same Interface in different scenarios. Have a look at java.util.List, java.util.Map, java.lang.Comparable. They allow the same interace to be used for different types, but with type safety. However, at some point you have to decide the actual concrete type your specific CalledInterface instance is going to deal with. As I said in my answer Generics are a compile time thing, so you have to decide beforehand, while developing your program. If you want this to work at runtime you need to resort to good old Object Oriented polymorphism. –  jbx Dec 7 '12 at 15:13

There are a few minor mistakes in your code:

protected Called c;

public Caller (CalledInterface arg) {
    c = arg;
}

You are not allowed to assign arg here, because the type CalledInterface is not a subtype of Called (it is the other way around) Also you should give type information when using CalledInterface (it is allowed to leave it out, but only for legacy purposes).

Now to the part you are wondering about. For the type Called, the compiler knows get() returns a String, if you are not interested in that, you can of course always use Object as the type of element. The compiler also knows that set() takes a String as argument, so it requires you to give one. In generics is essentially the same as using Object in a case without generics (even though it isn't allowed on the location you use it, because it doesn't make sense). This means that you would be telling the compiler to forget the type on the first line (calling get()) and to unforget it on the line below.

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Oops, I mean of course that the field c also was of type CalledInterface - I have amended my question to reflect that. However, I want to deal with CalledInterface from Caller without Caller needing to be aware of the generic type of CalledInterface. Is this possible? As far as I am aware, this isn't possible by replacing <?> with <Object> in the code above, is it? –  Vincent Dec 6 '12 at 12:32
    
<?> is the same as <? extends Object>, by adding <?> in your constructor you are saying you don't care about the type. You could make Caller generic which would allow you to use it. PS: I just tried your example in eclipse, the line c.set(c.get()); is not allowed either. –  Thirler Dec 6 '12 at 12:42
    
Exactly, I don't want Caller to care about the type CalledInterface is working with. If I can't figure this out, making Caller generic is what I'll resort to, but that means I'll have to define the same type twice (once for Caller and once for the Called I'm passing to it). As for the example, I must've been mistaken then :S –  Vincent Dec 7 '12 at 12:24

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