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I'm trying to use a German-style CSV file with DBI and DBD::CSV. This, in turn, uses Text::CSV to parse the file. I want to query the data in that file using SQL.

Let's look at the file first. It is separated by semicolons (;), and the numbers in it look like this: 5,23, which is equivalent to the English 5.23.

Here's what I've got so far:

use strict; use warnings;
use DBI;

# create the database handle
my $dbh = DBI->connect(
  'dbi:CSV:',
  undef, undef,
  {
    f_dir => '.',
    f_schema => undef,
    f_ext => '.csv',
    f_encoding => 'latin-1',
    csv_eol => "\n",
    csv_sep_char => ';',
    csv_tables => {
      foo => {
        file => 'foo.csv',
        #skip_first_row => 0,
        col_names => [ map { "col$_" } (1..3)  ], # see annotation below
      },
    },
  },
) or croak $DBI::errstr;

my $sth = $dbh->prepare(
  'SELECT col3 FROM foo WHERE col3 > 80.50 ORDER BY col3 ASC'
);
$sth->execute;

while (my $res = $sth->fetchrow_hashref) {
  say $res->{col3};
}

Now, this looks quite nice. The problem is that the SQL (meaning SQL::Statement, which is somewhere down the line from DBI and DBD::CSV) does not regard the data in col3, which is a floating-point value with a comma in the middle, as a float. Instead, it treats the column as an integer, because it doesn't understand the comma.

Here's some example data:

foo;foo;81,90
bar;bar;80,50
baz;baz;80,70

So the above code with this data will result in one line of output: 81,90. Of course, that is wrong. It used the int() part of col3 with the comparison, which is right, but not what I want.

Question: How can I tell it to treat the numbers with the comma as float?

Things I've thought about:

  • I've not found any built-in way in Text::CSV to do this. I'm not sure where in Text::CSV I could hook this in, or if there is a mechanism in Text::CSV to put such things in at all.
  • I don't know if it poses a problem that DBD::CSV wants to use Text::CSV_XS if possible.
  • Maybe I can do it later, after the data has been read and is already stored away somewhere, but I'm not yet sure where the right access point is.
  • I understand that the stuff is stored in SQL::Statement. I don't yet know where. This could be handy somehow.

Changing the source CSV file to have dots instead of commas is not an option.

I'm open for all kinds of suggestions. Other approaches to the whole CSV via SQL thing are welcome, too. Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
Do you absolutely need to access this data through SQL? –  Borodin Dec 6 '12 at 12:21
1  
Who is this "it" that you speak of? "It doesn't understand the comma", "It used the int() part of col3"... Perl? A module? The database? –  TLP Dec 6 '12 at 12:26
    
@Borodin the general idea is to have multiple data sources. We are trying to upgrade from opening and <>ing the CSV file to a DB-based approach, where the DB will be mysql or sqlite. The first step is supposed to be building SQL, but using the CSV file. There are other processes involved with the CSV file that we do not want to break. So, yes, I'd like to do it with SQL. –  simbabque Dec 6 '12 at 12:28
    
@TLP that would be some module involved with executing the query. Probably something within the DBI. The goal is to get that query to work. –  simbabque Dec 6 '12 at 12:30
1  
@simbabque Perhaps it could be done somehow by using the german locale settings for decimal point numbers? POSIX module? –  TLP Dec 6 '12 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need to write a user-defined function using SQL::Statement::Functions (already loaded as part of DBD::CSV).

This program does what you want. Adding 0.0 to the transformed string is strictly unnecessary, but it makes the point about the purpose of the subroutine. (Note also your typo in the f_encoding parameter to the connect call.)

use strict;
use warnings;

use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect(
  'dbi:CSV:',
  undef, undef,
  {
    f_dir => '.',
    f_schema => undef,
    f_ext => '.csv',
    f_encoding => 'latin-1',
    csv_eol => "\n",
    csv_sep_char => ';',
    csv_tables => {
      foo => {
        file => 'test.csv',
        #skip_first_row => 0,
        col_names => [ map { "col$_" } (1..3)  ], # see annotation below
      },
    },
  },
) or croak $DBI::errstr;

$dbh->do('CREATE FUNCTION comma_float EXTERNAL');

sub comma_float {
  my ($self, $sth, $n) = @_;
  $n =~ tr/,/./;
  return $n + 0.0;
}

my $sth = $dbh->prepare(
  'SELECT col3 FROM foo WHERE comma_float(col3) > 80.50 ORDER BY col3 ASC'
);
$sth->execute;

while (my $res = $sth->fetchrow_hashref) {
  say $res->{col3};
}

output

80,70
81,90
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! This is great, I wasn't aware this was possible. Still, this means the function gets called for each row, in each query? I did a quick benchmark, and it increased the duration of prepare and execute from 1.1s to 1.6s. I believe that it would in the long run be faster to change the underlying SQL::Statement::RAM::Table. Any thoughts? –  simbabque Dec 6 '12 at 12:59
    
I don't believe the prepare takes 1.6 seconds? Are you timing multiple executions? The golden rule of optimisation is not to do it until you find you need to. Anyway a 45% increase in delay isn't that great: waiting fifteen minutes instead of ten is no big deal. It looks like SQL::Statement::RAM is meant for use internally, and I doubt if there's anything you could do that way that is different from CREATE TEMP TABLE footemp AS SELECT col1, col2, comma_float(col3). –  Borodin Dec 6 '12 at 13:27
    
I'm not timing multiple executions. my $t0 = Benchmark->new; my $sth = $dbh->prepare( 'SELECT col2, col3 FROM artikel WHERE comma_float(col3) > 90.50 ORDER BY col3 ASC' ); $sth->execute; my $t1 = Benchmark->new; my $sth2 = $dbh->prepare( 'SELECT col2, col3 FROM artikel WHERE col3 > 90.50 ORDER BY col3 ASC' ); $sth2->execute; my $t2 = Benchmark->new; say timestr(timediff($t1, $t0)); say timestr(timediff($t2, $t1)); Ugly, I know. It says: 1.6931 wallclock secs ( 1.12 usr + 0.06 sys = 1.19 CPU) 1.16507 wallclock secs ( 0.69 usr + 0.05 sys = 0.73 CPU) My file has about 20k rows. –  simbabque Dec 6 '12 at 13:49
    
@simbabque: Ah well I assumed you were using the code and data in your question :) I'm getting 1.6s and 1.8s for a 30,000-record file. What is the size of your expected data? I would have thought under two seconds was fine. The problem seems to be more to do with DBD::CSV than the user-defined function - you can't expect to get high speed from a CSV file! If this is a game-breaker you should just read the CSV files into SQLite tables and work from there. –  Borodin Dec 6 '12 at 14:05
    
@simbabque: You should set up a timethese to compare the speeds properly. –  Borodin Dec 6 '12 at 14:09

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