Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a following code in a most inner loop of my program

struct V {
  float val [200]; // 0 <= val[i] <= 1
};

V a[600];
V b[250];
V c[250];
V d[350];
V e[350];

// ... init values in a,b,c,d,e ...

int findmax(int ai, int bi, int ci, int di, int ei) {
  float best_val = 0.0;
  int best_ii = -1;

  for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ii++) {
    float act_val =
      a[ai].val[ii] +
      b[bi].val[ii] +
      c[ci].val[ii] +
      d[ci].val[ii] +
      e[ci].val[ii];

    if (act_val > best_val) {
      best_val = act_val;
      best_ii = ii;
    }
  }

  return best_ii;
}

I don't care whether it will be some clever algorithm (but this would be most interesting) or some C++ tricks or intrinsics or assembler. But I need to make findmax function more efficient.

Big thanks in advance.

Edit: It seems that branch is the slowest operation (misprediction?).

share|improve this question
    
Can you tell us more about the outer loop? Perhaps in combination with that there are more possibilities for optimization. –  SebastianK Sep 3 '09 at 16:29
1  
Micro-optimization, meaning it may be handled by the compiler, but doesn't really hurt, and I've seen rather surprising benchmarks on how big a difference it makes sometimes: switch i++ to ++i. That way the value is never copied before incrementing. –  krdluzni Sep 3 '09 at 16:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, I see no obvious room for algorithmic optimizations. Theoreticaly one could only calculate the sum of the five vectors until it is obvious that the maximum cannot be reached, but this would add way to much overhead for only summing five numbers. You could try using multiple threads and assign ranges to the threads, but you have to think about the thread creation overhead when you have only 200 very short work items.

So I tend to say that using Assembler and MMX or SSE instructions on x86 or maybe a (machine specific) C++ a library providing access to this instructions is your best bet.

share|improve this answer
    
"you have only 200 very short work items." Although he says the code is in a most inner loop, so if he's doing it for a lot of different combinations of ai, bi, etc, then perhaps he could multithread and break the work up at a level higher than this function. Depends whether the vector contents and each set of 5 params depends on the results of previous calculations, or not. Also it's not thread creation overhead so much as thread communication overhead, since you could maintain a pool of worker threads rather than creating them each call. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 16:37
    
If you're bringing threading in to the equation, you also have to consider whether this will really help, which depends on the greater purpose of the app and where it will be running. –  krdluzni Sep 3 '09 at 16:41
    
Having said that, multi-threading will never make this algorithm "more efficient", just potentially faster. It will not end up taking fewer CPU cycles/ops to calculate the result. Multi-threading normally only helps if there are idle cores on the machine, which on e.g. a server running lots of apps, there might very well not be. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 16:43
    
Ah, krdluzni beat me to it. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 16:44

This might help a bit if the compiler is having difficulty short cutting the jumps:

int findmax(int ai, int bi, int ci, int di, int ei) {
  float best_val = 0.0;
  int best_ii = -1;

  float* a_it = &a[ai].val[0]
  float* b_it = &b[bi].val[0]
  float* c_it = &c[ci].val[0]
  float* d_it = &d[di].val[0] // assume typo ci->di
  float* e_it = &e[ei].val[0] // assume typo ci->ei

  for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ii++) {
    float act_val = *(a_it++) + *(b_it++) + *(c_it++) + *(d_it++) + *(e_it++);
    best_val =  (act_val <= best_val) ? best_val : act_val; // becomes _fsel
    best_ii  =  (act_val <= best_val) ? best_ii : ii; // becomes _fsel
  }

  return best_ii;
}

Generating a sum table might be faster in terms of cache misses I'll post this in a bit:

int findmax(int ai, int bi, int ci, int di, int ei) {
  float best_val = 0.0;
  int best_ii = -1;

  float* its[] = {&a[ai].val[0], &a[bi].val[0], &a[ci].val[0], &a[di].val[0], &a[ei].val[0] };

  V sums;
  for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ii++) {
    sums.val[ii] = * (++its[0]);
  }

  for (int iter = 1 ; iter < 5; ++iter)  {
      for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ii++) {
        sums.val[ii] += * (++its[iter]);
      }
    }
  }
  for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ii++) {
    best_val =  (sums.val[ii] <= best_val) ? best_val : sums.val[ii]; // becomes _fsel
    best_ii  =  (sums.val[ii] <= best_val) ? best_ii : ii; // becomes _fsel
  } 
  return best_ii;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you don't fancy my method try the _fsel method of setting bet_val and best_ii –  Charles Beattie Sep 3 '09 at 17:17

I don't see any way to do this without examining each sum, making this an O(n) problem. But since your data are laid out linearly, the Intel/AMD MMX or SSE instructions might help. See this link for Microsoft's implementation of intrinsics:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y0dh78ez(VS.71).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
To be specific, you want the addps (packed addition) instruction, which will in effect do 4 float additions simultaneously, dumping the result into an XMM register which amounts to a float[4]. If you store a few of these, you may then also get a gain using maxps (packed max) to do parallel comparisons. Obviously the last few comparisons have to be done with single-float operations rather than SSE. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 16:53

Unless compiler optimizes them out for you, computing a[ai], etc., in the loop will cost you some time (however slight) given that they are fixed for the duration of findmax. In light of that you might try something like:

int findmax(int ai, int bi, int ci, int di, int ei) {
    float    best_val = std::numeric_limits<float>::min();
    int      best_ii = 0;
    const V& a(a[ai]);
    const V& b(b[bi]);
    const V& c(c[ci]);
    const V& d(d[di]);
    const V& e(e[ei]);

    for (int ii = 0; ii < 200; ++ii) {
        float act_val = a.val[ii] + b.val[ii] + c.val[ii] +
                        d.val[ii] + e.val[ii];

        if (act_val > best_val) {
            best_val = act_val;
            best_ii = ii;
        }
    }

    return best_ii;
}

Other means of improving the code might be to alter the way the data is represented, leading to a different (but much faster) findmax algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, there isn't much room for optimization within the function, but perhaps you find the same max multiple times, or the data is laid out in such a way that you can find shortcuts, these are the things that should speed up the overall code. –  DeusAduro Sep 3 '09 at 16:31
2  
Any reasonable compiler would perform this optimization for you automatically. –  Mark Ransom Sep 3 '09 at 16:33
1  
best_val should be initialized to negative infinity –  Jason S Sep 3 '09 at 18:51

Try to iterate all vectors at once. Here's the example for two vectors:

for (float *ap = a[ai].val, *bp = b[bi].val; ap - a[ai].val < 200; ap++, bp ++) {
    float act_val = *ap + *bp;
    // check for max and return if necessary
}
share|improve this answer

Take a look at loop unwinding (and Duff's device for a specific, but far more complicated, example). Those are the only real algorithm optimizations I can come up with.

Loop_unwinding

Duff's_device

share|improve this answer
    
You don't actually need Duff's device when the loop is always the same length (in this case 200). Either use a factor of 200 as the length to unroll, or else use a non-factor but start with a single goto into the middle of the loop. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 17:21
    
You're right, you don't, but I thought it would serve as an interesting example of unwinding. In all honesty, though, Duff's device has a lot more going on than a regular unwind, and I'm thinking about removing it from my post. –  krdluzni Sep 3 '09 at 17:45
1  
I'm totally in favour of everyone seeing Duff's device, though, just so long as they know not to use it unless absolutely necessary. And maybe not even then :-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 22:10

You can't really get that much faster than that without additional information about the data (values) stored in a, b, c, d, and e. You have to inspect every sum to determine which one is the greatest.

It get's a little worse for Nth element queries, but fortunately, you didn't ask that one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.