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I have a mysql table tbl_exam

user_ID | User_name | semester | math | english |
1       | John      | 1st      | 67   |  73     |
1       | John      | 2nd      | 82   |  59     |

after this, i want to compare 1st semester marks with 2nd semester.i.e Math is improving and English is degrading

user_ID | User_name | math  | english  |
1       | John      | good  | bad      |

I just fetch the result but have no idea how to solve.Any help would be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is your question? –  Michiel Pater Dec 6 '12 at 12:57
    
i want to comapre 2 values, the idea is same like subtraction. Look at the above table. Math have 82-67 = +15 (Result improving) English have 59-73 = -14 (Result degrading) –  Arif Dec 6 '12 at 13:00
1  
what have you tried ? –  echo_Me Dec 6 '12 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

SELECT A.user_id, A.user_name, IF((B.math - A.math) > 0, 'good', 'bad') math, 
         IF((B.english - A.english) > 0, 'good', 'bad') english
FROM (SELECT user_id, user_name, math, english 
FROM tbl_exam WHERE semester = '1st') AS A 
INNER JOIN 
(SELECT user_id, user_name, math, english 
FROM tbl_exam WHERE semester = '2nd') AS B ON A.user_id = B.user_id 
share|improve this answer
    
Not very familiar with mysql optimizations, but would argue that the inner selects should be replaced with joins to tables and condition moved to WHERE or ON, toughts ? –  drk Dec 6 '12 at 13:09
    
Just create an index on semester column and it will run faster. –  Saharsh Shah Dec 6 '12 at 13:12
    
what he get the result of this sql ? –  echo_Me Dec 6 '12 at 13:23
1  
Same as he had shown in his question –  Saharsh Shah Dec 6 '12 at 13:26
    
@SaharshShah your query is perfect, thanks for giving me your precious time :) –  Arif Dec 8 '12 at 6:07

your table seems little wrong , because John have 2 user_ID . it should be like that

  ID |user_ID | User_name | semester | math | english |
   1 |1       | John      | 1st      | 67   |  73     |
   2 |1       | John      | 2nd      | 82   |  59     |

like that user_ID is same with John only ID will be incremented.

share|improve this answer
    
ya IDs are 1 as it is 1 user.It was by mistake :) –  Arif Dec 6 '12 at 13:14

You have the semester column, but semesters repeat each year. So if you were tracking John's complete academic career, you wouldn't be able to tell which year a particular 2nd semester belonged to.

Secondly, your schema is not normalized. There should be one table students with user_id and user_name. There should be a courses table with course_id, course_name, course_date. And there should be a marks table with mark_id, course_id, semester enum('1st','2nd') not null, user_id, mark. The marks table could have a unique id composed of course_id and semester and user_id, which will prevent a student from having more than one mark per semester per course and will logically mean that each year the courses table will get a new record for each course offered even if that course is the same as last year's course.

Given the above, the query would be something like:

SELECT m1.user_id, m1.course_id, 
  CASE WHEN m1.mark > m2.mark THEN 'bad' 
       WHEN m1.mark < m2.mark THEN 'good' 
       ELSE 'same' END AS trend
FROM marks m1 JOIN marks m2 
  ON (m1.user_id = m2.user_id AND m1.course_id= m2.course_id)
WHERE m1.semester=1 AND m2.semester=2;

which would give this:

user_id, course_id, trend
      1,         1, 'good'
      1,         2, 'bad'

To substitute English for the ids,

SELECT user_name, course_name, 
      CASE WHEN m1.mark > m2.mark THEN 'bad' 
           WHEN m1.mark < m2.mark THEN 'good' 
           ELSE 'same' END AS trend
FROM marks m1 JOIN marks m2 
  ON (m1.user_id = m2.user_id AND m1.course_id= m2.course_id)
  JOIN users u ON (m1.user_id=u.user_id)
  JOIN courses c ON (m1.course_id=c.course_id)
WHERE m1.semester=1 AND m2.semester=2;

which would give this:

user_id, course_id, trend
   John,      math, 'good'
   John,   english, 'bad'

You could fiddle around with aggregate functions and pivot the output. But since you're outputting with PHP, I'd probably do the pivot there. That allows you to handle an arbitrary number of courses without knowing what they will be ahead of time.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a million for your reply,your query works for me, i have normalization in my tables but here i just make one demo like sql table just to get concept and i did, other wise my query is very long & i have to retrieve a lot of data. Thanks again for your time :) –  Arif Dec 8 '12 at 6:11

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