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!=I am currently working on the following erase recursive bool function that thakes list and int as arguments and return true if the int was found and deleted and false if it was not found in the list. It seems to work, but the problem is that it deletes the next int number in the list, and not the current:

 typedef struct E_Type * List;

 struct E_Type
 {
        int data;
        List next = 0;
 };

bool erase(const List & l, int data){
List current = l;   
if (current == 0)
{
   return false;
 }
else if (current->data == data)
{
      List deleteNode = new E_Type;
     deleteNode = current->next;//probably this causes the error, but how can I point it to the current without crashing the program
     current->next = deleteNode->next;
     delete deleteNode;
     return true;
}

else if (current->data != data)
{
      return erase(current->next, data);
}


}
share|improve this question
2  
Possibly unrelated: List deleteNode = new E_Type; deleteNode = current->next;? That's a memory leak right there. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 6 '12 at 13:49
1  
One more unrelated commentary: what is the purpose of else if (current->data > data)? The return statement is the same anyway. –  prazuber Dec 6 '12 at 13:51
1  
The statement if (current == 0) will not work, unless List is typedef'd to be a pointer type, or the class have an overloaded == operator which takes a pointer/integer. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 6 '12 at 13:51
    
@Joachim yes List is typedef with poiner to E_Type / R.Martinho you are right, i will fix this leak, thanks –  Emilio Dec 6 '12 at 13:54
    
There are even more possible errors and problems with your code, why not just use std::list (or even better, std::vector)? –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 6 '12 at 13:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only node you're considering is the current one, so you must have a provision for modifying l:

if (current->data == data)
{
  l = current->next;
  delete current;
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
then he'd need the pointer to l, not the reference, but that should work then. –  SvenS Dec 6 '12 at 14:09
    
@SvenS: No, l is a pointer, which is passed in by reference. –  Beta Dec 6 '12 at 14:10
    
argh, you're right. All those years and I still get confused by that stuff o_O –  SvenS Dec 6 '12 at 14:16
    
@SvenS, you're not alone. Function pointers still make my ears bleed. –  Beta Dec 6 '12 at 14:18
    
Yeah, it is really confusing and the information about more complicated functions like this is scarce. Your suggestions worked, thanks @Beta –  Emilio Dec 6 '12 at 14:19

There are two basic type of lists:

  • single-linked lists (each node knows its next node) and
  • double-linked lists (each node knows its next as well as its previous node).

If, like in your case, one has a single-linked list, you must not check the CURRENT node for equality to 'data', because at that point it is too late to change the next pointer of the last node. So you always have to check the NEXT pointer for equality, like this:

bool erase(const List & l, int data)
{
    List current = l;   
    if (current == 0)
        return false;

    // special case: node to be deleted is the first one
    if (current->data == data)
    {
        delete current;
        return true;
    }

    if (current->next && current->next->data == data) // next exists and must be erased
    {
        List deleteNode = current->next;   // Step 1: save ptr to next
        current->next = deleteNode->next;  // Step 2: reassign current->next ptr
        delete deleteNode;                 // Step 3: delete the node
        return true;
    }

    return erase(current->next, data);
}

Note: I spared your last 'else if' condition. The 'else' because the previous if had a return in it, and the 'if' since its condition was just the negation of the previous 'if', which - if the program comes this far - would always hold.

Regards

share|improve this answer

Here are some pointers.

An iterative approach

When you're iterating over your list, maintaining a pointer to the current element is not enough. You also need to maintain a pointer to the previous element, since you will need to fix up previous->next if you delete the current element.

On top of that, deleting the first element of the list will require special handling.

A recursive approach

Write a recursive function that will take a pointer to the head of the list, find & delete the required element, and return a pointer to the new head of the list. To do this, you need to:

  1. Define and implement the base case. Handling one-element lists seems like a natural candidate.
  2. Define the recursion. There are two cases: either the head of the list is the element you're looking for, or it isn't. Figure out what you need to do in both cases, and take it from there.
share|improve this answer

If you have a list:
A --> B --> C --> D
And you want to delete C, you have to:
Store C in a temp variable
Change B->next=C->next
delete C.
So you need to find B to be able to modify it.
You should certainly not create any new instance of E_type.

share|improve this answer

Your condition

else if (current->data == data)

will stop on the node which has the value data. You then go on to delete the node after this node in your code.

If you want to keep the rest of the code same, then that line should be :

else if ((current->next)->data == data)

with an extra check, in case the first element is the only element in the list.

A simpler way would be to keep a pointer that points to the element before the current element, and then deleting the node which is referred by that pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
this is a good suggestion, thanks I will to implement it. –  Emilio Dec 6 '12 at 14:20

You will need to change the next pointer of the preceding entry. So everything is find, but you have to check current->next->data against data, not current->data.

Be sure to check for NULL-pointers in case current is the last entry in the list!

share|improve this answer
    
What if the first entry in the list is the one that should be deleted? –  Beta Dec 6 '12 at 14:09
    
Got me there, too ;) As AshRJ wrote, you'd need to check for that as well as the last one. –  SvenS Dec 6 '12 at 15:02

When you delete a node from a list, you need to point the previous node to the next one. Since you have a singly linked list, there are 2 options:

  1. Maintain a pointer to previous node in your erase function. When encountering desired node, link previous node to current->next and delete current node. Needs special treatment for the first node in the list.

  2. When you encounter desired node, copy the content of the current->next into current, then delete current->next. This way you don't need an extra parameter in your function. Needs special treatment for the last node in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively you could copy the data of the next node to the current node & delete the next node –  another.anon.coward Dec 6 '12 at 13:57
    
Haven't thought about it, sorry. –  prazuber Dec 6 '12 at 13:57
    
Edited to add second approach. –  prazuber Dec 6 '12 at 14:16

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