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How to make the function only runs once per button?
if clicks in "click me" only works once, and the same for the other buttons Order not to put much code, I put an example..:
http://jsbin.com/apexod/1/watch

<html>
<head>
<title></title>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="click me" onclick="hello()"><br>
<input type="button" value="click me1" onclick="hello()"><br>
<input type="button" value="click me2" onclick="hello()">
<script>
   function hello(){
       alert("hello");
}
</script>
</body>
</html>
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can just remove the onclick

<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <input type="button" value="click" onclick="hello(this)"><br>
    <input type="button" value="click1" onclick="hello(this)"><br>
    <input type="button" value="click2" onclick="hello(this)">
<script>
       function hello(btn){ 
           alert("hello");
           btn.onclick = function(){};
    }
</script>
</body>
</html>
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Change your onclick handlers so that the function can reference the element clicked.

<input type="button" value="click me" onclick="hello.call(this)"><br>
<input type="button" value="click me1" onclick="hello.call(this)"><br>
<input type="button" value="click me2" onclick="hello.call(this)">

Then change the function to remove the handler.

function hello(){
    alert("hello");
    this.onclick = null;
}
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Does the hello.call act on the element? I would expect you to do hello(this) and have function hello(but) { but.onclick=null } - ah, as I see the accepted answer does –  mplungjan Dec 6 '12 at 14:28
    
@mplungjan: Yes, using .call(this) is setting the this value of the function to the current this. I prefer it over hello(this) because it allows the function to behave like typical event handlers where this is a reference to the element. You can also do hello.call(this, event), and it will pass along the event object... even in IE. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 6 '12 at 14:36
    
Amazing how I learn something new every day... I asked because I just rejected someone's attempt to "fix" your code with an edit. –  mplungjan Dec 6 '12 at 19:46
    
@mplungjan: Yeah, I noticed that. Thanks for rejecting it. :) –  I Hate Lazy Dec 6 '12 at 19:47
    
I hardly ever use inline handlers anymore, but a good thing to know. First time I see it. –  mplungjan Dec 6 '12 at 19:48
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It’s easier to manage if you add event listeners in the script (it’s also consider good practice to separate behaviour from presentation):

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/4N4ur/

<input type="button" value="click">
<input type="button" value="click1">
<input type="button" value="click2">​

<script>
var inputs = document.getElementsByTagName('input');
for(var i=0; i<inputs.length; i++) {
    inputs[i].onclick = function() {
        hello();
        this.onclick = null; // reset the handler
    }
}
function hello() {
    alert('hello';
}
</script>
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on click of buttton call the function below with button id or name as param

    <script>
       function hello(caller){
          if (caller == 'button1' && $("#button1clicked").val() != '1')
          {
         // Your code to execute for the function
         alert("hello");
       // set value for button1clicked
       $("#button1clicked").val("1");
       }else {
       // do nothing
       }

     }
     </script>

Add the above conditions for no of buttons

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