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I'm currently working on a project that involves calculating electric fields and there gradients in 3D space. This requires numerically solving Laplace's equation and I have written a class to do this (below) which works but here it is just for background;

################################################################################
#  class:  ThreeDRectLaplaceSolver                                             #
#                                                                              #
#  A class to solve the Laplace equation given the potential on the boundaries.#                                                         
################################################################################
class ThreeDCuboidLaplaceSolver:

#############################################################################
# Store the init variables as class varibales, calculate the grid spacing to#
# solve Laplace's equation on and create arrays to store the iterations and #
# results in.                                                               #   
############################################################################
def __init__(self, xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, zmin, zmax, gridstep):

    self.xmin, self.xmax = xmin, xmax
    self.ymin, self.ymax = ymin, ymax
    self.zmin, self.zmax = zmin, zmax

    self.xpoints  = int((xmax-xmin)/gridstep) + 1
    self.ypoints  = int((ymax-ymin)/gridstep) + 1
    self.zpoints  = int((zmax-zmin)/gridstep) + 1

    self.dx = (xmax-xmin)/self.xpoints
    self.dy = (ymax-ymin)/self.ypoints
    self.dz = (zmax-zmin)/self.zpoints

    self.v     = np.zeros((self.xpoints, self.ypoints, self.zpoints))
    self.old_v = self.v.copy()

    self.timeStep = 0

############################################################################
# Set constant values along the boundaries                                 #
#                                                                          #
# Top(bottom) is +ive(-ive) end of z-axis                                  #
# Right(left) is +ive(-ive) end of y-axis                                  #
# Front(back) is +ive(-ive) end of x-axis                                  #
############################################################################   
def setBC(self, frontBC, backBC, rightBC, leftBC, topBC, bottomBC):

    self.v[-1, :, :] = frontBC
    self.v[0 , :, :] = backBC
    self.v[: ,-1, :] = rightBC
    self.v[: , 0, :] = leftBC
    self.v[: , :,-1] = topBC
    self.v[: , :, 0] = bottomBC

    self.old_v = self.v.copy()

def solve_slow(self, PercentageTolerance = 5):

    PercentageError = PercentageTolerance + 1

    while PercentageError > PercentageTolerance:

        self.Iterate()
        PercentageError = self.Get_LargestPercentageError()
        print "Completed iteration number %s \n Percentage Error is %s\n" % (str(self.timeStep), str(PercentageError))

    return self.v

def solve_quick(self, Tolerance = 2):

    AbsError = Tolerance + 1

    while AbsError > Tolerance:

        self.Iterate()
        AbsError = self.Get_LargestAbsError()
        print "Completed iteration number %s \nAbsolute Error is %s\n" % (str(self.timeStep), str(AbsError))

    return self.v 

def Get_LargestAbsError(self):

    return np.sqrt((self.v - self.old_v)**2).max()

def Get_LargestPercentageError(self):

    AbsDiff = (np.sqrt((self.v - self.old_v)**2)).flatten()

    v = self.v.flatten()

    vLength = len(v)

    Errors = []

    i=0
    while i < vLength:

        if v[i]==0 and AbsDiff[i]==0:
            Errors.append(0)

        elif v[i]==0 and AbsDiff[i]!=0:
            Errors.append(np.infty)

        else:    
            Errors.append(AbsDiff[i]/v[i])

        i+=1

    return max(Errors)*100

# Perform one round of iteration (ie the value at each point is iterated by one timestep)    
def Iterate(self):

    self.old_v = self.v.copy()

    print self.Get_vAt(0,5,0)

    self.v[1:-1,1:-1,1:-1] = (1/26)*(self.v[0:-2, 2:, 2:  ] + self.v[0:-2, 1:-1, 2:  ] + self.v[0:-2, 0:-2, 2:  ] +\
                                     self.v[1:-1, 2:, 2:  ] + self.v[1:-1, 1:-1, 2:  ] + self.v[1:-1, 0:-2, 2:  ] +\
                                     self.v[2:  , 2:, 2:  ] + self.v[2:  , 1:-1, 2:  ] + self.v[2:  , 0:-2, 2:  ] +\

                                     self.v[0:-2, 2:, 1:-1] + self.v[0:-2, 1:-1, 1:-1] + self.v[0:-2, 0:-2, 1:-1] +\
                                     self.v[1:-1, 2:, 1:-1] +                            self.v[1:-1, 0:-2, 1:-1] +\
                                     self.v[2:  , 2:, 1:-1] + self.v[2:  , 1:-1, 1:-1] + self.v[2:  , 0:-2, 1:-1] +\

                                     self.v[0:-2, 2:, 0:-2] + self.v[0:-2, 1:-1, 0:-2] + self.v[0:-2, 0:-2, 0:-2] +\
                                     self.v[1:-1, 2:, 0:-2] + self.v[1:-1, 1:-1, 0:-2] + self.v[1:-1, 0:-2, 0:-2] +\
                                     self.v[2:  , 2:, 0:-2] + self.v[2:  , 1:-1, 0:-2] + self.v[2:  , 0:-2, 0:-2])

    self.timeStep += 1

# Iterate through a certain number of time steps    
def IterateSteps(self, timeSteps):

    i = 0
    while i < timeSteps:

        self.Iterate()

        i+=1

# Get the value of v at a point (entered as coordinates, NOT indices)        
def Get_vAt(self, xPoint, yPoint, zPoint):

    # Find the indices nearest to the coordinates entered

    diff = [np.sqrt((x-xPoint)**2) for x in np.linspace(self.xmin,self.xmax,self.xpoints)]
    xIndex = diff.index(min(diff))

    diff = [np.sqrt((y-yPoint)**2) for y in np.linspace(self.ymin,self.ymax,self.ypoints)]
    yIndex = diff.index(min(diff))

    diff = [np.sqrt((z-zPoint)**2) for z in np.linspace(self.zmin,self.zmax,self.zpoints)]
    zIndex = diff.index(min(diff))

    # retun the value from of v at this point
    return self.v[xIndex, yIndex, zIndex]

So when I run a the following

    solver = ThreeDCuboidLaplaceSolver(0, 20, 0, 10, 0, 20, 1)

TwoDsolver = TwoDRectLaplaceSolver(0,20,0,10,1)
TwoDsolver.setBC(1000,0,0,0)

v_0 = np.zeros((21,11))
v_0[4:6,4:6] = 1000
v_0[14:15, 9:10] = 2000

solver.setBC(0,0,0,0,0,v_0)
v = solver.solve_quick(0.00001)

I get a 3D numpy array with the value of the potential (V) at each point on my grid. However in order to do more useful things with this I would like to be able to approximate this array of values with a continuous function so I can calculate the field and its gradient at points not on my grid.

A) Is this possibe? B) How would you go about doing this? I have seen basic scipy fitting functions but nothing that would handle 3D data in this way (or indeed fit an analogous function for a 2D array).

Might be a long shot that someone has tried to do this before but any help would be really appreciated,

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
    
Hey, thanks for the quick response. The link you gave (if I have understood it right, I have only had a quick play) is really useful for finding the value of the field at a point not on my grid. I noticed that you set an order for the spline interpolation which if I have understood correctly means you have to guess whether the field between grid points is linear, quadratic, cubic ect. Since I don't know this, is there any way to perform a similar operation that automatically calculates the best fit to all the data points? –  user1562862 Dec 6 '12 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/scipy.ndimage.interpolation.map_coordinates.html uses splines to interpolate the data and you choose the degree of the spline with the order paramter, default 3.

If you are familiar with spline interpolation it "patches" datapoints using low degree polynomials. A quick read on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spline_interpolation or http://math.tut.fi/~piche/numa2/lecture16.pdf

The order of the polynomial reduces error at the cost of computation time, if your data is not so irregular you can go ahead and try with a lower order.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I understand. For completeness my confusion arose from the fact that the data beyond the given array is assumed to be constant with the data at the boundary, hence getting unexpected results for higher orders of interpolation. Thank you both! –  user1562862 Dec 6 '12 at 14:53

Another option might be looking at Finite Element Method (FEM) libraries. With proper elements, interpolating gradients is in general more accurate than finite differences based methods. E.g. Fenics has a nice python interface. In the tutorial the little more general case of the poisson equation is presented, which can be easily adapted to the Laplace equation.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks possibly very useful, thanks for the head up @Dietrich –  user1562862 Dec 6 '12 at 22:46

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