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I am currently using a normal looping to check if the list of numbers are in order.

I am currently learning LINQ and I want to know how can I implement in LINQ to check if the sequence of numbers are in correct order.

For example I have this list of sequence number:

1.0
1.1
1.2
1.4
2.0

The program needs to flag as error the line 1.4 because 1.3 is missing.

How can I achieve that using LINQ?

Thanks for all your help. :)

It's like table of contents:

1.1 followed by 1.3 is invalid, 1 followed by 2 is valid. 1.4 followed by 2 is valid.

Here's the code that I am using it still has a lot of lapses I think:

using (System.IO.StreamReader reader = new System.IO.StreamReader("D:\\test.txt"))
{
    double prevNumber = 0;

    while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
    {
        double curNumber = double.Parse(reader.ReadLine());
        double x = Math.Round(curNumber - prevNumber, 1);

        if (x == 0.1)
        {
            prevNumber = curNumber;
        }

        else
        {
            int prev = (int)Math.Floor(prevNumber);
            int cur = (int)Math.Floor(curNumber);

            if ((cur - prev) == 1)
            {
                prevNumber = curNumber;
            }
            else
            {
                //error found
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is your normal looping code? Paste it here. –  Azhar Khorasany Dec 6 '12 at 14:00
    
Why are 1.5, 1.6, etc. not considered to be missing? Could there be a number like 1.11? If so, would it come between 1.1 and 1.2 or after 1.9 and 1.10? –  Mark Byers Dec 6 '12 at 14:01
1  
Your question is confusing - the values are in the right order, but they're apparently incomplete. Those are two very different properties. Please edit your question to give more precise requirements. –  Jon Skeet Dec 6 '12 at 14:01
    
@JRC You might want to rename thus question - it seems you're not really concerned about order but about... contiguity or something. –  Rawling Dec 6 '12 at 14:02
2  
@DominicKexel Heretic! –  Rawling Dec 6 '12 at 14:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This method takes a filename and returns an array of line numbers of incorrect versions. For your example it returns { 4 }.

It only handles numbers of the form x.y, as that appears to be all you want it to handle.

static int[] IncorrectLines(string filename)
{
    // Parse the file into an array of ints, 10* each version number.
    var ints =  File.ReadLines(filename)
        .Select(s => (int)(10 * decimal.Parse(s))).ToArray();
    // Pair each number up with the previous one.
    var pairs = ints
        .Zip(ints.Skip(1), (p, c) => new { Current = c, Previous = p });
    // Include the line numbers
    var withLineNos = pairs
        .Select((pair, index) => new { Pair = pair, LineNo = index + 2 });
    // Only keep incorrect lines
    var incorrect = withLineNos.Where(o => ! (         // not one of either:
            o.Pair.Current - 1 == o.Pair.Previous ||   // simple increment
            (o.Pair.Current % 10 == 0 &&               // major increment
             (o.Pair.Current / 10) - 1 == o.Pair.Previous / 10)
        ));
    return incorrect.Select(o => o.LineNo).ToArray();
}

Honestly? I think you're better off with a loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Man, you hit what I really need!! This is awesome! New learning for tonight! Thanks for this! –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 14:57
    
Rawling, this method didn't handle the wholeNumbers? It only the numbers with decimal, how can I make it handle also the wholenumbers? –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 16:10
    
@JRC How do you mean? You mean it doesn't break if you put in (1.0, 3.0) say? –  Rawling Dec 6 '12 at 16:11
    
I tried the file containing 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 and it didn't find the error. –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 16:13
1  
Oh my bad Rawling! I'm using a wrong file LOL, sorry sorry! thanks man! this is great! –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 16:33

So, if I understand correctly, you want to loop through a sorted list of doubles (with precision of one decimal place) and determine whether or not -- if decimal places exist for a whole number -- that their difference is not greater than 0.1.

We'll assume your list is sorted:

List<double> contents = new List<double>() {1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 2.0};

You would call IsValid on that list:

bool IsValid(List<double> contents) {
  //Get the distinct whole numbers
  var wholeNumbers = contents.Select(t => Math.Floor(t)).Distinct();
  foreach (var num in wholeNumbers) {

    //Get the "subcontents" for this whole number (chapter)
    var subContents = contents.Where(t => Math.Floor(t) == num).ToList();
    for (int i = 0; i < subContents.Count() - 1; i++) {

      //If the subcontents are different by something other than 0.1, it's invalid
      if (subContents.Count() > 1 && Math.Round(subContents[i + 1] - subContents[i], 1) != 0.1) {
        return false;
      }
    }
  }
  return true;
}

(Note that if the subcategories were 1.14, 1.24, 1.34, etc, it would still consider that valid.)

share|improve this answer
    
I test this method, but it always returns true, but anyway I get your point here, and you give me a good hint on what I need to do, thanks Doc! :) –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 14:43
1  
Try again, I edited it and tested it. Should work now. For some reason I had to round the subContents[i + 1] - subContents[i] to one decimal place. –  Daniel Dec 6 '12 at 14:44
    
Great! thanks Doc! –  jomsk1e Dec 6 '12 at 14:48
    
This doesn't mind if the major versions are completely out of order, as long as the minor versions for each are in order. It doesn't mind if 1.4 is followed by 2.1. It iterates through the input far more often than just calling GroupBy(d => Math.Floor(d)). –  Rawling Dec 6 '12 at 14:53

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