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Is it possible to count the number of members using JsonPath?

Using spring mvc test I'm testing a controller that generates

{"foo": "oof", "bar": "rab"}

with

standaloneSetup(new FooController(fooService)).build()
            .perform(get("/something").accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)).andExpect(status().isOk())
            .andExpect(jsonPath("$.foo").value("oof"))
            .andExpect(jsonPath("$.bar").value("rab"));

I'd like to make sure that no other members are present in the generated json. Hopefully by counting them using jsonPath. Is it possible? Alternate solutions are welcome too.

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3 Answers 3

To test size of array: jsonPath("$", hasSize(4))

To count members of object: jsonPath("$.*", hasSize(4))


I.e. to test that API returns an array of 4 items:

accepted value: [1,2,3,4]

mockMvc.perform(get(API_URL))
       .andExpect(jsonPath("$", hasSize(4)));

to test that API returns an object containing 2 members:

accepted value: {"foo": "oof", "bar": "rab"}

mockMvc.perform(get(API_URL))
       .andExpect(jsonPath("$.*", hasSize(2)));

I'm using Hamcrest version 1.3 and Spring Test 3.2.5.RELEASE

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9  
for anyone wondering: the full method is org.hamcrest.Matchers.hasSize and it's in hamcrest-all and not hamcrest-core –  matt b Apr 25 '14 at 20:33

Been dealing with this myself today. It doesn't seem like this is implemented in the available assertions. However, there is a method to pass in an org.hamcrest.Matcher object. With that you can do something like the following:

final int count = 4; // expected count

jsonPath("$").value(new BaseMatcher() {
    @Override
    public boolean matches(Object obj) {
        return obj instanceof JSONObject && ((JSONObject) obj).size() == count;
    }

    @Override
    public void describeTo(Description description) {
        // nothing for now
    }
})
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Well, its just a Javascript object so you can use myobject.length or to make it ES5-compatible:

Object.keys(obj).length
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