Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Considering "private" is the default access modifier for class Members, why is the keyword even needed?

share|improve this question
9  
Brought to you by the Redundancy Department of Redundancy! –  Brad Wilson Sep 26 '08 at 2:53
    
@Kiwi: about your edit - it's the default for classes too, not just class members, right? –  Esteban Araya Sep 26 '08 at 2:55
    
@Brad: Excellent humor man. –  Esteban Araya Sep 26 '08 at 2:56
1  
The default for classes is internal, not private. –  Brad Wilson Sep 26 '08 at 2:56
4  
Brad: That should be "The Department of Redundancy Department" :) –  Lars Mæhlum Sep 26 '08 at 12:13

13 Answers 13

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It's for you (and future maintainers), not the compiler.

share|improve this answer

There's a certain amount of misinformation here:

"The default access modifier is not private but internal"

well, that depends on what you're talking about. For members of a type, it's private. For top-level types themselves, it's internal.

"Private is only the default for methods on a type"

no, it's the default for all members of a type - properties, events, fields, operators, constructors, methods, nested types and anything else I've forgotten.

"Actually, if the class or struct is not declared with an access modifier it defaults to internal"

Only for top-level types. For nested types, it's private.

Other than for restricting property access for one part but not the other, the default is basically always "as restrictive as can be."

Personally, I dither on the issue of whether to be explicit. The "pro" for using the default is that it highlights anywhere that you're making something more visible than the most restrictive level. The "pro" for explicitly specifying it is that it's more obvious to those who don't know the above rule, and it shows that you've thought about it a bit.

Eric Lippert goes with the explicit form, and I'm starting to lean that way too.

See http://csharpindepth.com/ViewNote.aspx?NoteID=54 for a little bit more on this.

share|improve this answer

Explicitness. I never use the default and always explicitly add the modifier.

This could be because of my Java background where the default was 'package' (roughly equivalent to 'internal' in C#) and so the difference always bothered me. I found explicitness to be preferable.

I also use ReSharper now which defaults to being explicit, so it only confirms and reinforces my bias :)

share|improve this answer

The private modifier explains intent.

A private member variable is not intended for direct manipulation outside the class. get/set accessors may or may not be created for the variable.

A private method is not intended for use outside the class. This may be for internal functionality only. Or you could make a default constructor private to prevent the construction of the class without passing in values.

The private modifier (and others like it) can be a useful way of writing self documenting code.

share|improve this answer

As pointed out by Jon Skeet in his book C# In Depth, there is one place in C# where the private keyword is required to achieve an effect.

If my memory serves correctly, the private keyword is the only way to create a privately scoped property getter or setter, when its opposite has greater than private accessibility. Example:

public bool CanAccessTheMissileCodes
{
    get { return canAccessTheMissileCodes; }
    private set { canAccessTheMissileCodes = value; }
}

The private keyword is required to achieve this, because an additional property accessability modifier can only narrow the scope, not widen it. (Otherwise, one might have been able to create a private (by default) property and then add a public modifier.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1: This is an interesting take on the question. –  280Z28 Jun 19 '13 at 13:38

Private is only the default for methods on a type, but the private modifier is used elsewhere.

From C# Language Specification 3.0 (msdn) Section 3.5.1

Depending on the context in which a member declaration takes place, only certain types of declared accessibility are permitted. Furthermore, when a member declaration does not include any access modifiers, the context in which the declaration takes place determines the default declared accessibility.

  • Namespaces implicitly have public declared accessibility. No access modifiers are allowed on namespace declarations.
  • Types declared in compilation units or namespaces can have public or internal declared accessibility and default to internal declared accessibility.
  • Class members can have any of the five kinds of declared accessibility and default to private declared accessibility. (Note that a type declared as a member of a class can have any of the five kinds of declared accessibility, whereas a type declared as a member of a namespace can have only public or internal declared accessibility.)
  • Struct members can have public, internal, or private declared accessibility and default to private declared accessibility because structs are implicitly sealed. Struct members introduced in a struct (that is, not inherited by that struct) cannot have protected or protected internal declared accessibility. (Note that a type declared as a member of a struct can have public, internal, or private declared accessibility, whereas a type declared as a member of a namespace can have only public or internal declared accessibility.)
  • Interface members implicitly have public declared accessibility. No access modifiers are allowed on interface member declarations.
  • Enumeration members implicitly have public declared accessibility. No access modifiers are allowed on enumeration member declarations.
share|improve this answer

For symmetry and to conform with coding styles that like everything to be explicit (personally I like it ...)

share|improve this answer

For completenes. And some people actually prefer to be explicit in their code about the access modifiers on their methods.

share|improve this answer

Using private explicitly signals your intention and leaves clues for others who will support your code ;)

share|improve this answer

Some coding styles recommend that you put all the "public" items first, followed by the "private" items. Without a "private" keyword, you couldn't do it that way around.

Update: I didn't notice the "c#" tag on this so my answer applies more to C++ than to C#.

share|improve this answer
    
Um, visibility isn't modal in C# like it is in C++. The private keyword is necessary for the times when it isn't the default (and there are such times, such as class declarations), but putting "private" in front of a method is indeed redundant and unnecessary. –  Brad Wilson Sep 26 '08 at 2:52
    
That's true, but the question didn't actually mention C#. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 26 '08 at 3:02
    
Important to read the tags. :) –  Brad Wilson Sep 26 '08 at 3:04
    
Oh, quite right! It's easy to miss the medium-blue-on-pastel-blue bits. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 26 '08 at 3:45
    
Come on, you have 6000 reputation. The way the system works can't possibly be surprising to you. :) –  Brad Wilson Sep 26 '08 at 4:46

I usually leave private out but I find it useful for lining up code:

private   int    x;
public    string y;
protected float  z;

VS:

int x;

public    string y;
protected float  z;
share|improve this answer

As Robert Paulson said in his answer, the private modifier is not just used on members, but also on types. This becomes important because the default for types is internal which can leak unintentionally if you use the InternalsVisibleToAttribute.

share|improve this answer

Actually, if the class or struct is not declared with an access modifier it defaults to internal.

So if you want to make it private, use private.

share|improve this answer
    
if a type isn't nested it defaults to internal and non-nested types cannot be declared private (to what would they be private beyond internal visibility?) –  Mark Cidade Sep 26 '08 at 4:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.