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I've a service operation which I marked with the Authenticate attribute

[Authenticate]
[Route("/route/to/service", "POST")]
public class OperationA: IReturn<OperationAResponse>
{
 ...
}

The method IsAuthorized of the AuthProvider is called correctly when I call the service using the REST URL or using JsonServiceClient inside a unit test but is not called if I call the service from ASP.NET code behind (not MVC controller).

I don't use IoC to resolve the service inside my code behind but I use this code...

MyService service = AppHostBase.Instance.Container.TryResolve<MyService>();
service.Post(operationA);

Is there something I'm missing?

Thank you for your attention.

share|improve this question
1  
When calling service.Post you're calling the method directly on a class instance and not going through the full service-stack stack. Remember, in the end your services are just classes with methods. So, no, it won't run the code you're asking. The only way I've been able to accomplish this is to create a faux request to my service endpoint to force it through the full servicestack stack. – Eli Gassert Dec 6 '12 at 15:56

Just to clarify:

I don't use IoC to resolve the service inside my code behind but I use this code...

MyService service = AppHostBase.Instance.Container.TryResolve<MyService>();

You are using the IOC here, i.e. resolving an auto-wired instance of MyService from ServiceStack's IOC.

If you're service doesn't make use of the HTTP Request or Response objects than you can treat it like any normal class and call C# methods. If the service does (e.g. Auth/Registration) then you will also need to inject the current HTTP Request Context as well.

The CustomAuthenticationMvc UseCase project has an example of how to do this:

var helloService = AppHostBase.Resolve<HelloService>();
helloService.RequestContext = System.Web.HttpContext.Current.ToRequestContext();
var response = (HelloResponse)helloService.Any(new Hello { Name = "World" });
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the misunderstanding. With "I don't use IoC..." I wanted to say that the instance of my service is not a property of my code behind class automatically resolved by IoC container – Valentino Gattuso Dec 7 '12 at 11:26

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