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For some reason I can't use arc, so in my code below..

Foo.h

@interface Foo : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString * string;

@end

Foo.m

@implementation Foo

@synthesize string=_string;

- (void) bar {
    self.string = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"test1"];
    self.string = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"test2"];
}

-(void) dealloc
{
    [_string release];

    [super dealloc];
}
@end

The bar method might not always be called, or they can be called multitime.

Is only one release in the dealloc is all needed?

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i wonder stringWithFormat doesn't return a string in autorelease mode? –  Anoop Vaidya Dec 6 '12 at 16:46
1  
Why are you using stringWithFormat here? Those are not format strings. I know the point here is to ask about memory management but still, this indicates you don't understand how to use strings. Just use self.string = @"some text";. –  rmaddy Dec 6 '12 at 17:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, since you are using properties so setter method will take care of releasing memory allocation.It will allocate memory as follows:

-(void)setValue:(NSString *)strValue
{
   if(string)
   {
     [string release];
     string = nil;
   }
   string = [strValue copy];
}
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Actually no, not precisely. This will fail if you set the same object twice and it only has one reference. –  user529758 Dec 6 '12 at 17:04
    
@H2CO3 : please clear my doubt.. "stringWithFormat return a string in autorelease mode"..is this correct or not? –  Anoop Vaidya Dec 6 '12 at 17:41

Is only one release in the dealloc is all needed?

Yes.

Explanation: the setter method releases the old object that was assigned to the property and retains the new one.

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2  
I'd have answered the opposite: you don't want to be calling methods on a partially dealloc'd class, especially when allowing for potential subclasses and KVO observers. –  Tommy Dec 6 '12 at 16:33
    
@Tommy No. The memory management of properties is internal and not to be relied upon in actual code. Until an object hasn't called [super dealloc];, accessing it is valid. If the getters and setters do unexpected things or rely on something that is out of their scope, that's the reuslt of a badly designed code. –  user529758 Dec 6 '12 at 16:38
1  
Apple explicitly advises Don’t Use Accessor Methods in Initializer Methods and dealloc. –  Rob Dec 6 '12 at 16:49
1  
@H2CO3, the problem isn't that getters and setters might be doing something 'out of their scope' - any other object could be observing this object's string property. When it (anyOtherObject) receives a KVO notification it should be able to assume that the object it is observing isn't half-way through its -dealloc method. –  hooleyhoop Dec 6 '12 at 16:54
    
@hooleyhoop if you wish so... Still a brain-dead bad design. –  user529758 Dec 6 '12 at 16:57

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