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I've very little experience with webservices and am now faced with a tricky issue. A supplier to my organisation has exposed some of its data via a REST service(https calls following an initial https call to retrieve a token which expires following n calls or n minutes).

Most reporting in the organisation is done using SQL Reporting Services and I've been asked for help bridging the gap between SSRS and REST. The organisation may also want to use SSIS to retrieve some of the data.

I don't believe I can call the REST service easily from either of these technologies so I was thinking of wrapping the calls to the REST service in a .NET SOAP webservice, which I believe SSRS will be able to cope with.

Architecturally this seems wrong, and I'm sure there are some pitfalls waiting for me, but does this sound like an appopriate solution? (As an alternative I believe I could also write a custom data provider for SSRS but I'd then hit the same issues when I came to use SSIS)

Many Thanks, Andrew

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so I was thinking of wrapping the calls to the REST service in a .NET SOAP webservice

...

Architecturally this seems wrong, and I'm sure there are some pitfalls waiting for me, but does this sound like an appopriate solution?

there is no problem at all.. there is no architectural restriction which forbids access to one kind of web service from another.. you may implement it in various way and if you do not feel comfortable with performing HTTP request directly from SOAP method implementation, you can wrap REST web service communication in a Proxy object and hide details from SOAP method.

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