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I'm trying to call a method with a definition similar to the following (simplified to avoid confusion):

public static void Register<T>(T value) where T : BaseClass, IInterface

This works fine so long as I have a class instance that defines both of those values. The problem occurs when I pass a `BaseClass' into a method and then try to use that instance in the above declaration. For example:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass(BaseClass value)
    {
        Register(value);
    }
}

I can pass and instance of a class that implements both BaseClass and IInterface into the constructor, but when I try to use that value in the Register method I get a compilation error stating:

The type 'BaseClass' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Register(T)'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'BaseClass' to 'IInterface'.

If I change the type in the constructor like so:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass(IInterface value)
    {
        Register(value);
    }
}

I get an error stating:

The type 'IInterface' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Register(T)'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'IInterface' to 'BaseClass'.

This seems like a bit of a catch-22. Is there a way that I can define the parameter to indicate that it must implement both BaseClass and IInterface?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As I was writing the question I came up with the answer and thought I would post it instead of deleting the question.

I just need to redefine the class:

public class MyClass<T> where T : BaseClass, IInterface
{
    public MyClass(T value)
    {
        Register(value);
    }
}
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The solution given by Matt is an easy answer for situations where it is not necessary to store store the passed-in object in a field or collection. If you need to persist the passed-in object, things get much harder. It's easy for a SomeClass<T> where T meets multiple constraints, to store items of class T and pass them as generics to routines with such constraints, but if a class has a method SomeMethod<TParam>(TParam thing) where TParam:IFoo,BaseBar, it won't have any field of type TParam. It could store thing into a field of type IFoo or BaseBar, but unless BaseBar implements IFoo, or all passed-in instances are going to derive from one particular BaseBar derivative which implements IFoo, there's no way to specify that a field's type will meet both constraints (if every instance does derive from one particular BaseBar derivative which implements IFoo, one could simply use that type as a single constraint, or for that matter not bother with generics at all--just use that as the parameter type).

There are ways of getting around these issues, either using Reflection, an interface pattern I call ISelf<T>, or some tricky nested callback interfaces. In some cases, though, it may be better to provide alternatives to methods that take double-constrained parameters (have the methods take a parameter of one constraint type, cast it to the other type, and accept the lack of compile-time safety).

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This is the path that I was originally trying to go down. Glad to know it was a hard path and I had an easier path within my reach. –  Matt Dec 9 '12 at 1:40

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