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I feel like what I have is correct code, but obviously I am missing something here.

What I am trying to do is create an event method in the prototype object of my constructor. Here is what I have so far:

function Controls(but) {
    this.but = document.getElementById(but);
    this.but.onclick = function() {
        displayMessageTwo();
    }
}

Controls.prototype.displayMessageTwo = function() {
    alert("HELLO");
}

var Main = new Controls('testingTwo');

My logic here is that I am creating a constructor from which to build controls for something (let's say a slideshow).. this.but equals the html element of a link called whatever is passed as an argument to the constructor.

In my prototype object, I define my method and then create my object. However, this is not working as I had expected.

What am I doing wrong here?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect that when the event handler fires, the context of the invocation is not the instance on which you registered the callback.

Try something like the following

function Controls(but) {
    var that = this;
    this.but = document.getElementById(but);
    this.but.onclick = function() {
        that.displayMessageTwo(); // that is closed-in
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yup. This worked. I must've have forgot that that the onclick event returns a new function all together with a different scope. Is this the proper way to do something like this?? –  Sethen Dec 6 '12 at 17:01
    
@Sethen does the bind approach work? –  hvgotcodes Dec 6 '12 at 17:05
    
@hvgotcodes: Not in IE. –  Bergi Dec 6 '12 at 17:07
    
var that = this; is a closure by the way @SethenMaleno and yes this is pretty standard (in fact it is a must to understand closures (especially when dealing with closures that reference DOM elements as that causes memeory leaks) –  Paul Sullivan Dec 6 '12 at 17:23
    
I understand closures. I was just wondering if using the self = this paradigm is a good way to go about it, or if there is some other way I should be doing it. –  Sethen Dec 6 '12 at 18:37

What am I doing wrong here?

You are calling displayMessageTwo(); as if it was a global function. It is not, it is a inherited property on your instance. Usually you would refer to the instance with the this keyword, but inside the event handler you can't. Create a variable referencing the object, and call that one's method like so:

function Controls(but) {
    this.but = document.getElementById(but);

    var that = this;
    this.but.onclick = function() {
        that.displayMessageTwo();
    }
}

As your displayMessageTwo method does not care about its context (does not reference other properties via this), you even might assign it directly:

    this.but.onclick = this.displayMessageTwo;

But I'd recommend to avoid that, methods should always be executed with correct thisValue. You also might use bind:

    this.but.onclick = this.displayMessageTwo.bind(this);

but it needs additional code for older, non-supporting browsers.

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Thanks. This does work. Is this the proper way to go about something like this?? Is there a different way that is clearer? –  Sethen Dec 6 '12 at 17:03
    
Yes, this is the standard way of doing it. –  Bergi Dec 6 '12 at 17:03

I would think:

function Controls(but) {
    this.but = document.getElementById(but);
    this.but.onclick = this.displayMessageTwo;
}

Controls.prototype.displayMessageTwo = function() {
    alert("HELLO");
}

var Main = new Controls('testingTwo');

is clearer (assigning the function assigned to prototype.displayMessageTwo). If this doesn't work it may be because

 this.but.onclick = this.displayMessageTwo;

is evaluated before:

 Controls.prototype.displayMessageTwo = function() {

making it null...

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No, it is not evaluated before. –  Bergi Dec 6 '12 at 17:02

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