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I'm currently using the following pattern to create JS modules to be used. However, I can't figure out if there is any difference, or any benefit, to doing it in the first style vs the second.

1st way

var UI = UI || {};
(function () {
var BtnShape = function (x, y, width, height, size, color, text)
{
    this.initialise(x, y, width, height, size, color, text);
}
var p = BtnShape.prototype;

    p.isEnabled = false; //<--------------
    p.initialise = function (x, y, width, height, size, color, text)
    {}
UI.BtnShape = BtnShape;
})();

2nd way

var UI = UI || {};
(function () {
var BtnShape = function (x, y, width, height, size, color, text)
{
    this.initialise(x, y, width, height, size, color, text);
}
var p = BtnShape.prototype;

    p.initialise = function (x, y, width, height, size, color, text)
    {
            this.isEnabled = false; //<---------------
    }
UI.BtnShape = BtnShape;
})();
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only difference that I can see here is the order in which isEnabled property is set. By nesting the isEnabled property into the initialise function, you'd need to run the initalise procedure before the isEnabled has any value. I'd assume that you would run the initialise function before doing anything, but if you don't then isEnabled would be empty.

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1st way: isEnabled will be false, regardless of whether you called initialise() or not.

2nd way: isEnabled will be false only if you called initialise(), undefined otherwise.

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In first way, It is by default not enabled ( but not undefined)

// After all your code
var x= BtnShape.prototype;
// Here x is not enabled . If you want to enable it, you need to do it separately like below.
p.isEnabled = true;

In second way, when you initialize the object, by default it becomes false. Unless, you initialize, If you initialize, it becomes dialed. You need to separately enable it.

var y =BtnShape.prototype;
// Here if you don't initialize the object y, then isEnabled is undefined. 
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