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In the following SQL statement, why does it return multiple rows with the correct count instead of one row?

SELECT
  (
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM schema.table t WHERE t.column IS NULL
  ) AS t_Inserts,
   (
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM schema.table t WHERE t.column IS NOT NULL
  ) AS t_Updates
FROM
  schema.table t;

Note: I'm using Oracle.

Output:
t_Inserts,t_Updates
100,200
100,200
100,200
100,200
100,200
...
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2 Answers 2

The query you posted runs the t_Inserts subquery (and the t_Updates subquery) once for every row in schema.table. Since you're querying schema.table with no WHERE clause, the result set must have as many rows as schema.table has. If you want a single row, you could SELECT from the dual table

SELECT
  (
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM schema.table t WHERE t.column IS NULL
  ) AS t_Inserts,
   (
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM schema.table t WHERE t.column IS NOT NULL
  ) AS t_Updates
FROM
  dual

It would probably be more efficient, though, to do something like

SELECT SUM( CASE WHEN t.column IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END ) t_inserts,
       SUM( CASE WHEN t.column IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END ) t_updates
  FROM schema.table t;
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An alternative to @Justin's answer (+1):

SELECT COUNT(*)-COUNT(column) AS t_Inserts, COUNT(column) AS t_Updates
FROM schema.table;
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