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As per my understnding the difference between Response and Request is below

Request is - We request to server for like .aspx page

Response is - We get the .aspx page from server

So, I think, request is toward Server and response is what we got.

We have following terms

Request.QueryString
Request.RawUrl
Request.MapPath()

All these seems to go to server first and brings back the associated data. But the following term is contrary ?

Request.Cookies

Because the cookies creates at client side and value part is also fetched at client side using Response.Cookies

Your comments?

Query - 2 - Why it is useful to create/Access cookie using Request/Response.cookies? Because it can be created/fetched at client end in JavaScript.

Query 3 - Cookie resides at client end. Why do we send request to server ?

Query - 4 - Why do we write Response.Cookies? to go to server? Why? it creates at client end and accessed from client end. right? Why do we write Request.Cookies? Means fetching cookie information from server? Cookie is at client end. right?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Every time you send a Request to server, the cookies for that server are also sent.

Also, when the server sends you a Response it can include cookies for the next Request you send it to.

So Request.Cookies and Response.Cookies make perfect sense.

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ok. Why should we write response.cookies ? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:40
    
When the server wants to send a cookie to the client, eh? –  Richard Schneider Dec 6 '12 at 18:45
    
So when requesting for a web page, cookie collection goes to server and same collection come back to client..? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:53
    
That's the basic concept. There's are whole lot more of detail. But basically you got it. This is how sites can recognise you from previous visits. –  Richard Schneider Dec 6 '12 at 18:58

"When a browser makes a request to the server, it sends the cookies for that server along with the request. In your ASP.NET applications, you can read the cookies using the HttpRequest object, which is available as the Request property of your Page class. The structure of the HttpRequest object is essentially the same as that of the HttpResponse object, so you can read cookies out of the HttpRequest object much the same way you wrote cookies into the HttpResponse object."

ASP.NET Cookies Overview

"Cookies are sent to the browser via the HttpResponse object that exposes a collection called Cookies. You can access the HttpResponse object as the Response property of your Page class"

Beginner's Guide to ASP.NET Cookies

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Then why do we write Response.Cookies ? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:39
    
Response.Cookies is the cookie collection sent back to the client. forums.asp.net/t/1279490.aspx/1 –  IrishChieftain Dec 6 '12 at 18:40
    
This page says quite reverse –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:46
    
That page is old ASP and outdated. Read the MSDN documentation linked to above. –  IrishChieftain Dec 6 '12 at 18:48
    
So when requesting for a web page, cookie collection goes to server and same collection come back to client..? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:54

Both objects Request and Response "live" in the server. So Request holds the data sent by the User Agent (the Browser, like Chrome, IE, etc.). Examples of this data are, the POST and GET Variables, the User Agent, the language, IP Adress, and many more.

Response is the object that lets you send data to the User Agent (the browser), i.e. a Web Page, a stream of bytes (like a downloadable file), etc.

The cookies live in the client side, that's right, but is the browser that send this information, so this data comes in the Request object.

You receive the cookies via Request.Cookies, but you receive the cookies in the Server. If you are coding in C#, the code is in the Server point of view, so receive means, the server receives. If you want to access the cookies in the Client Side, you must use some client programming language like JavaScript.

I hope this helps.

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Response and Request are objects that live in the Server. So the point of view is on the Server Side. Is the Server that look the Request to see what the browser has sent –  Agustin Meriles Dec 6 '12 at 18:16
    
Cookie resides at client end. Why do we send request to server ? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:17
    
When you write for example, Request.Cookies you aren't "sending a Request". You are "accesing" the Request that the browser have just performed. –  Agustin Meriles Dec 6 '12 at 18:20
    
Yes. You are right. Why do we write Response.Cookies? to go to server? Why? it creates at client end and accessed from client end. right? Why do we write Request.Cookies? Means fetching cookie information from server? Cookie is at client end. right? –  abcdefghi Dec 6 '12 at 18:24
    
Request.Cookies holds the cookies coming FROM the client. In the other way, Response.Cookies are the cookies that are sent back to the browser. This is the way that you can create the cookies in first place. You must remember the concept that this objects (Response and Request) doesn't exists in the client. There are abstractions that live on the server side. –  Agustin Meriles Dec 6 '12 at 18:37

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