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I'd want to convert float/double to string, in Java and C, such that the outputs are both consistent and user friendly.

By "user friendly", I mean the string should be human readable and sound: a maximum number of significant digits, and some automatic switching to scientific notation when appropiate (the double could span all the valid range).

By "consistent" I mean that the strings should be exactly the same in Java and C (I'd tolerate some exceptions if they are really rare).

Why not use simply some printf format string, as "%.5g"? That works... almost. But sadly the meaning of the precision field is quite different in Java and C. Also, the switching from-to scientific notation is not very consistent, nor even the format itself (2 or 3 digits for the exponent...). And different C compilers sometimes produce different results.

Examples of differences for "%.5g"

double                  Java %.5g         gcc %.5g      tcc %.5g
1234.0                  1234.0            1234          1234 
123.45678               123.46            123.45678     123.46
0.000123456             0.00012346        0.00012346    0.00012346
0.000000000000123456    1.2346e-13        1.2346e-13    1.2346e-013

I can code a function in C or Java (or both), but I wonder if someone has already dealt with this. I'm not very concerned with performance, but yes with portability across C compilers.

share|improve this question
2  
What exact code leads to different output? – Dims Dec 6 '12 at 18:09
    
Did you try String.format() ? – AlexWien Dec 6 '12 at 18:14
    
Well, googling for Java printf shows several results that speak about compatibility with C, like sharkysoft.com/archive/printf or braju.com – madth3 Dec 6 '12 at 18:16
    
@Dims Lots. I'll add examples – leonbloy Dec 6 '12 at 18:19
    
I have very few (one) difference. And also differs from yours – Dims Dec 6 '12 at 18:34

If you really want base-10 floating-point output, it's probably easiest to write a JNI wrapper for C's printf here. The Java folks decided they needed to do printf themselves. Apart from what you've already noticed about %g, they decided to change the rounding behaviour and truncate output in a curious way. To wit:

System.out.printf("%.5g\n", 1.03125);
System.out.printf("%.5g\n", 1.09375);
1.0313
1.0938

gcc correctly rounds to even:

printf("%.5g\n", 1.03125);
printf("%.5g\n", 1.09375);
1.0312
1.0938

Notice that 1.03125 and 1.09375 are exactly representable as doubles since 1/32 = 0.3125.

Java's printf %g format wrongly truncates its output:

double d = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < 1035; i++) d /= 2;
System.out.printf("%.20g\n%.20a\n", d, d);
2.7161546124360000000e-312
0x0.00080000000000000000p-1022

Here's the right answer:

double d = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < 1035; i++) d /= 2;
printf("%.20g\n%.20a\n", d, d);
2.7161546124355485633e-312
0x0.00080000000000000000p-1022

1.0e-200 is normal but not exactly representable. Java pretends not to notice:

System.out.printf("%.20g\n%.20a\n", 1.0e-200, 1.0e-200);
1.0000000000000000000e-200
0x1.87e92154ef7ac0000000p-665

Here's the right answer:

printf("%.20g\n%.20a\n", 1.0e-200, 1.0e-200);
9.999999999999999821e-201
0x1.87e92154ef7ac0000000p-665

So you've either got to live with bizarro rounding behaviour in your printf or you piggyback off gcc and glibc's work. I can't recommend trying to print out floating-point numbers by yourself. Or you can just use %a, which AFAIK works perfectly fine in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Tanks. You are right, the behaviour of Java implementation is objectionable. But I'm more concerned with consistency, and we are not guaranteed that different C compilers have equivalent implementations (thet don't), nor even different Java JVMs. I chose, not to write my own printf, but to write an ad-hoc (but consistent) switching between "%f" and "%e", plus some dirty manual "normalizing". It seems to work ok, included your examples. – leonbloy Dec 7 '12 at 17:11
    
@leonbloy: Yeah, I'm not really sure what you want; do you want consistent output, do you want output that makes sense, or do you want output that agrees with whatever the native C library is? I guess I answered something in between the second and third. – tmyklebu Dec 8 '12 at 19:05
    
I'd want consistent output (same output for whichever C compiler and Java JRE) and 'reasonable' (in the spirit of what "%g" does) – leonbloy Dec 8 '12 at 19:24
1  
@leonbloy: Pretty sure you need to JNI it up, then, since C implementations are inconsistent (and some suck). Reality sucks. :) – tmyklebu Dec 8 '12 at 19:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, I ended coding my own functions. Tested with gcc and tcc over all the range of double, gives exactly the same output (except for very few very small values, less than 1E-319)

I post it in case someone finds it useful.

Java:

     /**
     * Returns a double with an adhoc formatting, compatible with its C counterpart
     * 
     * If the absolute value is not too small or too big (thresholdLow-thresholdHigh)
     * the floating format is used, elsewhere the scientific.
     * In addition 
     *  - trailing zeros in fractional part are removed
     *  - if the value (or mantisa) is integer, a trailing .0 is always included
     *  - the exponent in sci notation is two or three digits
     *  - positive and negative zero returns "0.0"
     *  - special vals: "NaN" "Infinite" "-Infinite"
     * 
     * Remember to set Locale.setDefault(Locale.US) in your program.
     * 
     * @param v double
     * @param formatFloat floating point format, suggested: "%.5f"
     * @param formatSci   scientific format, must use lowercase 'e' : "%.5e"   
     * @param thresholdLow 
     * @param thresholdHigh
     * @return formatted string
     */
    public static String sprintfDouble(double v, String formatFloat, String formatSci, double thresholdLow,
            double thresholdHigh) {
        if(v==0.0)
            return "0.0"; //dont care about negative zero 
        if(Double.isInfinite(v) || Double.isNaN(v))
            return String.format(formatFloat,v);

        boolean neg = false;
        if (v < 0) {
            v = -v;
            neg = true;
        }
        String e = "";
        String res;
        if (v > thresholdLow && v < thresholdHigh) {
            res = String.format(formatFloat, v);
        } else {
            res = String.format(formatSci, v);
            int sp = res.indexOf('e');
            e = res.substring(sp);
            res = res.substring(0, sp);
        }
        if (res.indexOf('.') < 0)
            res += "."; // add decimal point if not present
        res = res.replaceAll("0+$", ""); // trim trailing zeros 
        if (res.endsWith("."))
            res += "0"; // add traiing zero if nec
        res += e;
        if (neg)
            res = "-" + res;
        return res;
    }

    public static String sprintfDouble5(double v){
        return sprintfDouble(v, "%.5f","%.5e",0.01,1000000.0);
    }

C:

char * sprintfDouble(char *buf, double v, const char *floatFormat, const char *sciFormat, double thresholdLow, double thresholdHigh) {
    char *p;
    char *pd; /* pointer to '.' */
    char *pe; /* pd=, pe=pointer to 'e' (or null terminator) */
    char *buforig;
    int trimmed;
    if(v != v) { /* nan */
        sprintf(buf,"NaN");
        return buf;
    }
    if(v == v && (v - v) != 0.0) { /* infinity */
        sprintf(buf, v <  0 ? "-Infinity" :"Infinity");
    return buf;
    } 
    if(v==0) { /* positive or negative zero, dont distinguish*/
        sprintf(buf, "0.0");
    return buf;
    }
    buforig = buf;
    if(v <0) {
        v = -v;
        buf[0] = '-';
        buf++;
    }
    if( v > thresholdLow && v < thresholdHigh ) {
        sprintf(buf,floatFormat, v);
        pe = buf+strlen(buf);
        pd = (char *) strchr(buf,'.');
        if(pd == NULL) { /* no decimal point? add it */
            pd = pe;
            *pe++ = '.';
            *pe++ = '0';
            *pe = 0;
        }
    } else {
        sprintf(buf,sciFormat, v);
        pe  =  (char *)strchr(buf,'e');
        pd =   (char *)strchr(buf,'.');
        if(pd ==NULL) { /* no decimal point with scientific notation? rare but... */
            p= buf+ strlen(buf);
            while(p>=pe) {
                *p = *(p-2);
                p--;
            }
            pd = pe;
            *pe++ = '.';
            *pe++ = '0';
            *pe = 0;
        }
        /* three digits exponent with leading zero? trim it */
        if( (*(pe+2) == '0' ) && ( strlen(buf) - (pe-buf))==5) {
            *(pe+2)=*(pe+3);
            *(pe+3)=*(pe+4);
            *(pe+4)=*(pe+5);
        }
    } /* now trim trailing zeros  */
    trimmed = 0;
    p=pe-1;
    while(*p =='0' ) {
        p--;
        trimmed++;
    }
    if(*p=='.') {
        trimmed--;    // dont trim the zero after the decimal point
        p++;
    }
    if(trimmed>0) {
        p = pe;
        while(1) {
            *(p-trimmed) = *p;
            if(*p==0) break;
            p++;
        }
    }
    return buforig;
}

char * sprintfDouble5(char *buf,double v) {
    return sprintfDouble(buf, v, "%.5f", "%.5e", 0.01, 1000000.0);
}

Test code.

Java

static void test() { 
    Locale.setDefault(Locale.US);
    double start = 1.0;
    double x=start;
    for(int i=0;i<367;i++) {
        System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(x));
        x*= -7.0;
    }
    x=start;
    for(int i=0;i<6;i++) {
        System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(x));
        x/= -5;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<200;i++) {
        System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(x));
        x/= -42.01;
    }
    x=Math.PI*0.0000001;
    for(int i=0;i<20;i++) {
        System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(x));
        x*=10;
    }
    System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(0.0));
    System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(-0.0));
    System.out.println(sprintfDouble5(0.0/0.0));
}

C:

void test1() { 
    char buf[64];
    double start,x;
    int i;
    start = 1.0;
    x = start;
    for(i=0;i<367;i++) {
        printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,x));
        x *= -7.0;
    }
    x = start;
    for(i=0;i<6;i++) {
        printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,x));
        x /= -5;
    }
    for(i=0;i<200;i++) {
        printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,x));
        x/= -42.01;
    }
    x = atan(1.0) * 4 * 0.0000001; /* PI */
    for(i=0;i<20;i++) {
        printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,x));
        x *= 10;
    }
    printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,0.0));
    printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,-0.0));
    printf("%s\n",sprintfDouble5(buf,0.0/0.0));
}
share|improve this answer

This code

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

    double v;
    char format[] = "%.5g\n";

    v = 1234.0;
    printf(format, v);


    v = 123.45678;
    printf(format, v);

    v = 0.000123456;
    printf(format, v);

    v = 0.000000000000123456;
    printf(format, v);

}

gave me

1234
123.46
0.00012346
1.2346e-13

and this code

public class App13749802 {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        double v;
        String format = "%.5g";

        v = 1234.0;
        System.out.println(String.format(format, v));

        v = 123.45678;
        System.out.println(String.format(format, v));

        v = 0.000123456;
        System.out.println(String.format(format, v));

        v = 0.000000000000123456;
        System.out.println(String.format(format, v));
    }

}

gave me

1234,0
123,46
0,00012346
1,2346e-13

comma is because of my regional settings. So there is only one difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But that only shows that the format is more inconsistent than I thought. I'm appaled to see that your java gives different results than mine (apart from the locale, that you can fix by adding Locale.setDefault(Locale.US); at the program start ). Can you tell me your JRE and C compiler? – leonbloy Dec 6 '12 at 18:47
    
Ah, sorry, forget it. I have messed my Java output, I'll fix it – leonbloy Dec 6 '12 at 18:49
    
My JRE is 1.7, my C is GCC – Dims Dec 6 '12 at 18:50

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