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Im trying to concatenate a dynamic insert statement ( over 100 inserts ) and instead executing one by one, i want to concatenate all of the statements into only one variable.

Following, a basic exemple:

insert_ = " insert into table ( field,zone) values ('a','b'); "
insert_b = " insert into table ( field,zone) values ('c','d'); "
insert_c = " insert into table ( field,zone) values ('e','f'); "

list = []
list.append(insert_)
list.append(insert_b)
list.append(insert_c)
print list

Current output:

[" insert into table ( field,zone) values ('a','b'); ", " insert into table ( field,zone) values ('c','d'); ", " insert into table ( field,zone) values ('e','f'); "]

Desired output:

insert into table ( field,zone) values ('a','b'); insert into table ( field,zone) values ('c','d');  insert into table ( field,zone) values ('e','f');

Thanks for reading.

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1  
Why? If you are doing this for the reason I think, there may be a better way... –  RonaldBarzell Dec 6 '12 at 18:09
    
Performance , mostly, i noticed that i can do 1000 inserts at same time in less than 5 seconds. By performing one insert on a loop, i loose one second on opening and closing the connection to the database. –  Thales Dec 6 '12 at 18:10
2  
Don't EVER build up your own SQL statements, use either the Python DB API or an ORM like SQLAlchemy. Otherwise you're risking attacks like SQL injection. –  Lukas Graf Dec 6 '12 at 18:10
    
Also, your question title is misleading-- there are no dictionaries anywhere in this question. –  Colleen Dec 6 '12 at 18:13
1  
@Thales: Ok, that somewhat reduces the security concerns. It still would be much easier (and cleaner) to just use pysqlite or MySQLdb ;-) –  Lukas Graf Dec 6 '12 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
c = db.cursor()
values_to_insert = [("a","b"),("c","d"),...]
c.execute_many("INSERT INTO table (val1,val2) VALUES (?,?)",values_to_insert  )

this is what execute_many is for ...

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+1 for ease of use, clarity, reusability, input sanitization, ... –  Lukas Graf Dec 6 '12 at 18:20
    
Thank you for pointing that =) –  Thales Dec 7 '12 at 10:18

Simple as "".join(list) . Or don't use a list at all and just use string concatenation, as Hemesh said.

Also, please don't name your list "list". It's a reserved keyword in python (I sometimes fall into this trap myself, but it's a really bad idea).

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+1 for not using reserved words –  Anov Dec 6 '12 at 18:47

Just concatenate all of them, no need to use a list.

insert = insert_ + insert_b + insert_c
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and what if instead variables, results are results from a for loop? –  Thales Dec 6 '12 at 18:15
1  
insert = "" for q in li: insert += q –  Hemesh Singh Dec 6 '12 at 18:23
    
Writing code in comment is so hard. :( But I hope it makes sense. –  Hemesh Singh Dec 6 '12 at 18:25

Since join and simple addition have been suggested, here's another option for completeness:

insert = '%s %s %s' % (insert_a, insert_b, insert_c)
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