Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question showed up on one of my teacher's old final exams. How does one even think logically about arriving at the answer?

I am familiar with the bit-manipulation operators and conversion between hex and binary.

int whatisthis(int x) {
  x = (0x55555555 & x) + (0x55555555 & (x >>> 1)); 
  x = (0x33333333 & x) + (0x33333333 & (x >>> 2));
  x = (0x0f0f0f0f & x) + (0x0f0f0f0f & (x >>> 4));
  x = (0x00ff00ff & x) + (0x00ff00ff & (x >>> 8));
  x = (0x0000ffff & x) + (0x0000ffff & (x >>> 16));
return x;
}
share|improve this question
    
The question is: what is x >>> 4 ? Did you mean x >> 4 ? –  wildplasser Dec 6 '12 at 18:49
    
Logical shift vs arithmetic shift: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_shift –  jp24 Dec 6 '12 at 20:33
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Didn't you forget some left shifts?

x = ((0x55555555 & x) <<< 1) + (0x55555555 & (x >>> 1));
x = ((0x33333333 & x) <<< 2) + (0x33333333 & (x >>> 2));
snip...

This would then be the reversal of bits from left to right.
You can see that bits are moved together rather than one by one and this lead to a cost in O(log2(nbit))
(you invert 2^5=32 bits in 5 statements)

It might help you to rewrite the constants in binary to understand better how it works.

If there are no left shifts, then I can't help you because the additions will generate carry and I can't see any obvious meaning...

EDIT: OK, interesting, so this is for counting the number of bits set to 1 (also known as population count or popcount)... Here is a squeak Smalltalk quick test on 16 bits

| f |
f := [:x |
    | y |
    y := (x bitAnd: 16r5555) + (x >> 1 bitAnd: 16r5555).
    y := (y bitAnd: 16r3333) + (y >> 2 bitAnd: 16r3333).
    y := (y bitAnd: 16r0F0F) + (y >> 4 bitAnd: 16r0F0F).
    y := (y bitAnd: 16r00FF) + (y >> 8 bitAnd: 16r00FF).
    y].
^(0 to: 16rFFFF) detect: [:i | i bitCount ~= (f value: i)] ifNone: [nil]

The first statement handle each bit pairs. If no bit is set in the pair then it produce 00, if a single bit is set, it produces 01, if two bits are set, it produces 10.

00 -> 0+0 -> 00 = 0, no bit set
01 -> 1+0 -> 01 = 1, 1 bit set
10 -> 0+1 -> 01 = 1, 1 bit set
11 -> 1+1 -> 10 = 2, 2 bits set

So it count the number of bits in each pair.

The second statement handles group of 4 adjacent bits:

0000 -> 00+00 -> 0000 0+0=0 bits set
0001 -> 01+00 -> 0001 1+0=1 bits set
0010 -> 10+00 -> 0010 2+0=2 bits set
0100 -> 00+01 -> 0001 0+1=1 bits set
0101 -> 01+01 -> 0010 1+1=2 bits set
0110 -> 10+01 -> 0011 2+1=3 bits set
1000 -> 00+10 -> 0010 0+2=2 bits set
1001 -> 01+10 -> 0011 1+2=3 bits set
1010 -> 10+10 -> 0100 2+2=4 bits set

So, while the first step did replace each pair of bits by the number of bits set in this pair, the second did add this count in each pair of pair...

Next will handle each group of 8 adjacent bits, and sum the number of bits sets in two groups of 4...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! Unfortunately the problem has no left shifts, but I ran the numbers 1..14 through this program and see below for what I got. @aka.nice –  jp24 Dec 7 '12 at 22:59
    
0-->0 1-->1 2-->1 3-->2 4-->1 5-->2 6-->2 7-->3 8-->1 9-->2 10-->2 11-->3 12-->2 13-->3 14-->3 It looks like this method tells you the least number of powers of two to sum this number. Why?? @aka.nice –  jp24 Dec 7 '12 at 23:02
    
OK, once you give the solution it's relatively easy, not so when you don't know it in advance... If you can recognize the bit pattern, you'll see some recursion. Then you can try all combinations on 4 bits and extend to 8, 16, 32, ... –  aka.nice Dec 7 '12 at 23:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.