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Is it possible?

eg:

z = something;
w = something else;

if (x == z && y == z){
   Do something;
} or if (y == w){
   Do something else;
or if...
or if...

basically what i want is a simpler way of writing:

if (x == z && y == z){
   Do something;
else if (x == z && y == w){
   Do something else;
if else...
if else...

that doesnt compares x and z everytime (and that isnt the most obvious ones, like using mutiple ifs, unless that is the simpler one)

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closed as not a real question by L.B, Mac, Bridge, Mario, Explosion Pills Dec 7 '12 at 0:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
your question is very clear.... –  raym0nd Dec 6 '12 at 19:39
    
try it, that is the best way to find out - if you are lucky it might even compile. –  Casperah Dec 6 '12 at 19:41
    
if (x==z){ if (y ==z) {...} else if (y == w){...} } –  Seth Dec 6 '12 at 19:41
    
If your y mechanic is the same every time, write a method to handle y. if (x == z) { handleY(y); } –  JoshDM Dec 6 '12 at 19:59

5 Answers 5

Sounds like you just want nested if/else.

if (x == z) {
    if (y == z) {
        ...
    } else if (y == w) {
        ...
    } else {
        ...
    }
} else {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's precisely what I thought. –  Douglas Dec 6 '12 at 20:17

Check for x!=z first:

if (x != z)
{
  // maybe do nothing?
}
else if(y == z)
{
  // Do something;
}
else if (y == w)
{
}

or nested:

if (x == z)
{
  if(y == z){
    Do something;
  }
  else if (y == w){
  }
}
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switch (expression)
{
   case constant-expression:
      statement
      jump-statement
   [default:
      statement
      jump-statement]
}
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Just switch the order of your comparisons:

if (y == z && x == z)
{
   Do something;
}
else if (y == w && x == z)
{
   Do something else;
}
else if ...
else if ...

x will only be compared to z when the first condition is true, thanks to shortcircuiting.

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The point is that here, if y == Z and y == W are both false, then x == z will be compared twice. That's what he's trying to avoid (and if x or z causes side effects, or is expensive to calculate, it could matter). –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 19:47
    
@Servy that's the point of short-circuit comparisons. In the case you describe, x and z are never compared. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2a723cdk(v=vs.110).aspx "if x is false, y is not evaluated" –  David B Dec 6 '12 at 19:52
    
Sorry, I meant to say where both y == z and y == w are true and x == z is false. In that case you evaluate x == z twice. –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 19:54
    
@Servy but then z == w, which is unlikely. –  David B Dec 6 '12 at 19:57
    
Performing this refactor does make the redundant execution less likely, but still possible. Now assume that each of the boolean expressions relied on completely unrelated variables (a common example) in which you have if(A && B) else if (C && B). You can simply refactor that to not compare both to B through nested if statements. If nothing else, it results in less typing and makes the code easier to read. Given that it also has equal or better performance implications I see no reason to prefer this method, even if it's only slightly incorrect instead of completely incorrect. –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 20:01

You can do the comparison once and save the result in a local boolean variable. Then use that bool in the if statements.

bool b = (x==z);
if (b && y == z){
    Do something;
else if (b && y == w){
    Do something else;

I would still do the nested if that others have recommended, though.

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