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I have a list consisting of tuples in Python. I need to reference each index of each tuple to create a list of NBA player statics. The first index [0] in the tuple is the efficiency rating and the next two positions are the player name and lastly the team name. Right now the tuples are in a long list. When I run the program, all I get is an output of the first four tuples and not a list of the various tuples. I have tried to use append, but that did not help either.

Here is my code:

def get_data_list (file_name):
    data_file = open(file_name, "r")
    data = []
    player_list=[]
    for line_str in data_file:

        # strip end-of-line, split on commas, and append items to list
        data_list =line_str.strip().split(',')

        data_list.append (data)

        gp=int(data_list[6])
        mins=int(data_list[7])
        pts=int(data_list[8])
        oreb=int(data_list[9])
        dreb=int(data_list[10])
        reb=int(data_list[11])
        asts=int(data_list[12])
        stl=int(data_list[13])
        blk=int(data_list[14])
        to=int(data_list[15])
        pf=int(data_list[16])
        fga=int(data_list[17])
        fgm=int(data_list[18])
        fta=int(data_list[19])
        ftm=int(data_list[20])
        tpa=int(data_list[21])
        tpm=int(data_list[22])



        efficiency = ((pts+reb+asts+stl+blk)-(fgm-ftm-to))/gp        

       data_list.append (efficiency)
       data.append(data_list)
       score=data_list[24]
       first_name=data_list[2]
       last_name=data_list[3]
       team_name=data_list[4]
       player_tuple = score, last_name, first_name, team_name

       player_list.append(player_tuple)

       a=sorted(player_list)

       a.reverse()

   return a

def print_results (lst):
   """Print the result in a nice format"""
    print("The top 50 players based on efficiency are: ")
    print('*'*75)
    print('{:<20s}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}'.format(lst[(0)],lst[(1)],lst[(2)],lst[(3)]))

file_name1 = input("File name: ")

result_list = get_data_list (file_name1)

top_50_list=[]
top_50_list=result_list[:50]

print_results(top_50_list)

I think my problem is in the print_results function.

Please remember that I am taking an intro class so many of the advanced options are not an option for me. Please keep the solutions simple.

Boliver

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you should loop through yoru players in print_results? it is only showing 4 indexes from your list –  dm03514 Dec 6 '12 at 19:54
1  
The indentation on the lines "data_list.append (efficiency)" till "a.reverse()" are a bit off. Remember that Python is sensitive to indentation. Is this just a mistake in your pasting of the code? –  dupersuper Dec 6 '12 at 19:56

3 Answers 3

It looks like your problem is with the append function...

a=[some,list]
a.append(42) #a = [some,list,42]
a.append([1,2]) #now a = [some,list,42,[1,2]]

For you index 0 is itself an empty list

So in your code, for the first iteration of the loop:

data_list =line_str.strip().split(',')  # data_list = [some,list]
data_list.append (data)                 # data_list = [some,list,[]]  
...
data_list.append (efficiency)           # data_list = [some,list,[],efficiency]
data.append(data_list)                  # data = [[some,list,[],efficiency]]
...
a = something special

The loop then continues on until the last line of the input file

Then you return a. a is only returned once and is screwy because of the before mentioned shuffling.

Play with for loops and append a bit and you should work it out no problem.

And if you are feeling brave then look up yield. A generator would be perfect here

share|improve this answer

in print_results

def print_results (lst):
   """Print the result in a nice format"""
    print("The top 50 players based on efficiency are: ")
    print('*'*75)
    print('{:<20s}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}'.format(lst[(0)],lst[(1)],lst[(2)],lst[(3)]))

could be somethign like

def print_results(lst):
  """Print the result in a nice format"""
  print("The top 50 players based on efficiency are: ")
  print('*'*75)
  for player_tuple in lst:
     print('{:<20s}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}'.format(*player_tuple[:4]))

Since you have a list of tuples, each tuple representing a player, loop through each player and print out their information

share|improve this answer
    
That got it printing more than one line, only it is the same line over and over. It is takeing the first tuple and making it, in its entirity index [0], then the second tuple, index [1] and so forth. –  Boliver Allmon Dec 6 '12 at 20:02
1  
Or, slightly easier - .format(*player_tuple[:4]]) –  Jon Clements Dec 6 '12 at 20:07
    
I got it now. I had a typo and it was not working. Now I just have to clean up the output. Thanks for all the help. –  Boliver Allmon Dec 6 '12 at 20:08

I don't understand what your code is trying to do with data vs. data_list. I rewrote it to get rid of data. Also, after you compute efficiency you append it to the list, but then you seem to be pulling it off the list again as score. I simply got rid of that.

For working with files, best practice is to use a with statement so I rewrote to do that.

Also, you are converting string items to integer one at a time, when you could do them all in one go with a list comprehension. I hope list comprehensions are not a problem for you to use, because they make the code cleaner. The first list comprehension calls the .strip() method function on each of the three strings for names. The second one converts all the integers in one convenient way.

Instead of making a temp list named a and then reversing that list, I just specified the reverse=True option in sorted(). Now the list is built in reverse order, just what you want.

As others have noted, your print function needs a loop to print things in the list. Since the message in the print function says it prints the top 50, I changed the list slicing to happen inside the print function. Now the print function takes an optional argument specifying how many items to print; it has a default value of 50, so if you don't specify another value, it prints the top 50 items.

While you don't need to do it, there is a common Python feature of putting if __name__ == __main__: before your code. You can see an explanation here: What does <if __name__=="__main__":> do?

def get_data_list (file_name):
    player_list=[]
    with open(file_name, "r") as f:
        for line in f:
            # split line on commas, and convert items to integer values
            # make a list of the integer values.
            items = line.split(',')

            first_name = items[2].strip()
            last_name = items[3].strip()
            team_name = items[4].strip()

            data_list = [int(x) for x in items[6:]
            gp = data_list[0]
            mins = data_list[1]
            pts = data_list[2]
            oreb = data_list[3]
            dreb = data_list[4]
            reb = data_list[5]
            asts = data_list[6]
            stl = data_list[7]
            blk = data_list[8]
            to = data_list[9]
            pf = data_list[10]
            fga = data_list[11]
            fgm = data_list[12]
            fta = data_list[13]
            ftm = data_list[14]
            tpa = data_list[15]
            tpm = data_list[16]

            efficiency = ((pts+reb+asts+stl+blk)-(fgm-ftm-to))/gp        

            player_tuple = efficiency, last_name, first_name, team_name

            player_list.append(player_tuple)

    return sorted(player_list, reverse=True)

def print_results(lst, how_many=50):
    """Print the result in a nice format"""
    template = '{:<20}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}'

    print("The top {} players based on efficiency are: ".format(how_many))
    print('*'*75)
    for tup in lst[:how_many]:
        print(template.format(tup[0], tup[1], tup[2], tup[3]))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    file_name1 = input("File name: ")
    result_list = get_data_list(file_name1)
    print_results(result_list)

Now I'm going to smooth it out even further. This is using more advanced features in Python, but they are features that make things more convenient, not things that are just tricky.

First, instead of building a list with a list comprehension, and then picking items by index number, we will use a generator expression and directly unpack the items into variable names. A generator expression is just like a list comprehension, except that instead of building a list, it provides an "iterator" that can be looped over, or can be unpacked into variable names as I show here.

Second, in the print function, we just want to print all the values in the tuple, in order. Python provides a shortcut: putting a * in front of the tuple inside the call to .format() means "unpack this and use the unpacked values as the arguments to this function call".

def get_data_list (file_name):
    player_list=[]
    with open(file_name, "r") as f:
        for line in f:
            # Split line on commas and convert each item to integer.  Unpack
            # values directly into variable names.  We are using a
            # generator expression to convert all the items to integer,
            # and Python's ability to unpack an iterator into a tuple.
            items = line.strip().split(',')

            # use list slicing to select just the three string values
            first_name, last_name, team_name = (s.strip() for s in items[2:5])

            # Use a generator expression to convert all values to int.
            # Unpack directly to variable names using tuple unpacking.
            # Put parentheses so Python won't worry about multiple lines
            # of variable names.
            (
                gp, mins, pts, oreb, dreb, reb, asts,
                stl, blk, to, pf, fga, fgm, fta, ftm,
                tpa, tpm
            ) = (int(x) for x in items[6:])

            efficiency = ((pts+reb+asts+stl+blk)-(fgm-ftm-to))/gp        

            player_tuple = efficiency, last_name, first_name, team_name

            player_list.append(player_tuple)

    return sorted(player_list, reverse=True)

def print_results(lst, how_many=50):
    """Print the result in a nice format"""
    template = "{:<20}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}"

    print("The top {} players based on efficiency are: ".format(how_many))
    print('*'*75)
    for player_tuple in lst[:how_many]:
        print(template.format(*player_tuple))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    file_name1 = input("File name: ")
    result_list = get_data_list(file_name1)
    print_results(result_list)

EDIT: And here is another edited version. This one splits out the logic for parsing a line into a player_tuple into its own function. This makes get_data_list() very short.

def player_tuple(line):
    # Split line on commas and convert each item to integer.  Unpack
    # values directly into variable names.  We are using a
    # generator expression to convert all the items to integer,
    # and Python's ability to unpack an iterator into a tuple.
    items = line.strip().split(',')

    # use list slicing to select just the three string values
    first_name, last_name, team_name = (s.strip() for s in items[2:5])

    # use a generator expression to convert all values to int
    # unpack directly to variable names using tuple unpacking
    (
        gp, mins, pts, oreb, dreb, reb, asts,
        stl, blk, to, pf, fga, fgm, fta, ftm,
        tpa, tpm
    ) = (int(x) for x in items[6:])

    efficiency = ((pts+reb+asts+stl+blk)-(fgm-ftm-to))/gp        

    return efficiency, last_name, first_name, team_name

def get_data_list(file_name):
    with open(file_name, "r") as f:
        player_list = [player_tuple(line) for line in f]
    return sorted(player_list, reverse=True)

def print_results(lst, how_many=50):
    """Print the result in a nice format"""
    template = "{:<20}{:<20s}, {:<15s}{:<5s}"

    print("The top {} players based on efficiency are: ".format(how_many))
    print('*'*75)
    for player_tuple in lst[:how_many]:
        print(template.format(*player_tuple))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    file_name1 = input("File name: ")
    result_list = get_data_list(file_name1)
    print_results(result_list)

Now that we have player_tuple() as a function, we could simplify get_data_list() even further. I won't repeat the whole program, just the simplified get_data_list(). This is probably the code I would write if I had to solve this problem.

def get_data_list(file_name):
    with open(file_name, "r") as f:
        return sorted((player_tuple(line) for line in f), reverse=True)

Here we don't even explicitly build the list. We just make a generator expression that provides all the player_tuple values, and directly pass that to sorted(). There is no need for this list to be given a name inside get_data_list(); it can just be built and returned in one line.

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