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I'm writing a prompt - response style system with a bunch of various combinations of Maybe a, IO a, and MaybeT IO a, and there is a lof of stuff to take into account. Some IO actions for which there is no invalid input (and therefore aren't wrapped in MaybeT), some which are (and return an MaybeT IO a) some which aren't IO actions but can fail, so return Maybe a, and some that are just plain values and its beginning to seem that I have to remember inordinate combinations of <$>, Just, fmap, MaybeT, lift, =<<, and return just to get everything to be the right type. Is there any easier way to manage this or to reason about what functions I need to use to get my values where I need them? Or do I just have to hope I get better at it with time? Here is my example:

getPiece :: Player -> Board -> MaybeT IO Piece
getPiece player@(Player pieces _ _ _) board = piece
    where
        promptString = displayToUserForPlayer player board ++ "\n" ++ (display player) ++ "\n" ++ "Enter piece number: "
        input :: MaybeT IO String
        input = lift $ prompt promptString
        index :: MaybeT IO Int
        index = MaybeT <$> return <$> ((fmap cvtFrom1indexedInt) . maybeRead) =<< input
        piece :: MaybeT IO Piece
        piece = MaybeT <$> return <$> maybeIndex pieces =<< index

getRotatedPiece :: Player -> Board -> MaybeT IO Piece
getRotatedPiece player@(Player pieces _ _ _) board = piece
    where
        promptString :: MaybeT IO String
        promptString = (++) <$> displayListString <*> restOfString
        input :: MaybeT IO String
        input = MaybeT <$> (fmap Just) <$> prompt =<< promptString
        index :: MaybeT IO Int
        index = MaybeT <$> return <$> ((fmap cvtFrom1indexedInt) . maybeRead) =<< input
        piece :: MaybeT IO Piece
        piece = MaybeT <$> return <$> maybeIndex pieces =<< index
        rotatedPieceList :: MaybeT IO [Piece]
        rotatedPieceList = rotations <$> getPiece player board
        displayListString :: MaybeT IO String
        displayListString = displayNumberedList <$> rotatedPieceList
        restOfString :: MaybeT IO String
        restOfString = MaybeT <$> return <$> Just $ "\nEnter rotation number:"

I must say, I am disappointed at the lack of conciseness, even if I removed the type hints I could likely write a shorter function to do the same thing in C# or python

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2  
Use lift and try to write all your monadic code without using the constructors (that will fix your verbosity issue, as well as making refactoring easier) –  jberryman Dec 6 '12 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Since you provided only a code fragment, I cannot try to refactor it. However, this is what I'd do: Most monads have a corresponding type class. The reason for it is exactly what you need here: When you create a monad using a monad transformer, it will inherit the operations of the inner monads (if appropriate). So you can forget about the inner monads and work just within the final monad.

In your case, you have MaybeT IO. It's instance of MonadPlus and of MonadIO. So you can refactor the code that returns Maybe something to work with a general MonadPlus instance instead, just replace Just with return and Nothing with mzero. Like:

-- before
checkNumber :: Int -> Maybe Int
checkNumber x | x > 0       = Just x
              | otherwise   = Nothing x
-- after
checkNumber :: MonadPlus m => Int -> m Int
checkNumber x | x > 0       = return x
              | otherwise   = mzero
-- or just: checkNumber = mfilter (> 0) . return

It will work with any MonadPlus, including Maybe and MaybeT IO.

And you can refactor the code that returns IO something to work with a general MonadIO instance:

-- before
doSomeIO :: IO ()
doSomeIO = getLine >>= putStrLn
-- after
doSomeIO :: MonadIO m => m ()
doSomeIO = liftIO $ getLine >>= putStrLn

This way, you can forget about <$>/fmap/liftM, Just, MaybeT etc. You just use return, mzero and in some places liftIO.

This will also help you to create a more general code. If you later realize that you need to add something to the monad stack, the existing code won't break, as long as the new monad stack implements the same type classes.

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A less ambitious answer from me. Looking at your code, your operations like getPiece don't really return any information from the a particular error site. You can probably get away with just using IO and turning exceptions into Maybe values if you really want those. Some sample code I put together with some undefined functions referenced in your code:

import Control.Exception (handle, IOException)

data Board = Board deriving (Show)
data Piece = Piece deriving (Show)
type Pieces = [Piece]
data Player = Player Pieces () () () deriving (Show)

prompt :: String -> IO String
prompt = undefined

cvtFrom1indexedInt :: Int -> Int
cvtFrom1indexedInt = undefined

maybeIndex :: Pieces -> Int -> Maybe Piece
maybeIndex = undefined

displayToUserForPlayer :: Player -> Board -> String
displayToUserForPlayer = undefined

display :: Player -> String
display = undefined

-- I used this when testing, to deal with the Prelude.undefined errors
--returnSilently :: SomeException -> IO (Maybe a)
returnSilently :: IOException -> IO (Maybe a)
returnSilently e = return Nothing

getPiece :: Player -> Board -> IO (Maybe Piece)
getPiece player@(Player pieces _ _ _) board = handle returnSilently $ do
    let promptString = displayToUserForPlayer player board ++ "\n" ++ (display player) ++ "\n" ++ "Enter piece number: "
    input <- prompt promptString
    let index = cvtFrom1indexedInt (read input)
    return (maybeIndex pieces index)

main = do
    maybePiece <- getPiece (Player [] () () ()) Board
    putStrLn ("Got piece: " ++ show maybePiece)

Notably I've moved from MaybeT IO Piece to just IO (Maybe Piece). Instead of using fmap or lift I've just used do notation for referring to the intermediate results of my IO action.

Going on your comments about C# or Python, I hope this was the sort of simpler answer you were looking for.

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