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I have a mechanism like the following for retrieving certain parameters for a limited number of different types of objects I need to handle:

template <class T>
struct params {};

template <>
struct params<FooObj>
{
    static const int paramA = 17;
    static const int paramB = 29;
};

this simplifies my code later because in a switch statement when I handle treating different objects, if I get a FooObj then all I have to do is something like this:

typedef params<FooObj> paramsT;

and then in that code snippet I have access to parameters to work with that FooObj via paramsT::paramC or whatever.

Now I have run into an object where I have something like this:

template <>
struct params<BarObj>
{
    static const int paramA  = 0;
    static const int paramB  = 9;
    static const int paramC  = 17;
    static const int paramD1 = 18;
    static const int paramE1 = 20;
    static const int paramD2 = 28;
    static const int paramE2 = 30;
    static const int paramD3 = 38;
    static const int paramE3 = 40;
    static const int paramD4 = 48;
    static const int paramE4 = 50;
    static const int paramD5 = 58;
    static const int paramE5 = 60;
    static const int paramD6 = 68;
    static const int paramE6 = 70;
};

and when I'm handling this object I started writing something like the following:

typedef params<BarObj> paramsT;
BarObj bar;
//load the first 3 params via the above info into bar

int a,b;
for (int i = 1; i <= 6; ++i)
{
    a = doSomethingA(bla + paramsT::paramD1);
    b = doSomethingB(bla + paramsT::paramE1);
    bla.paramD1 = functionOf(stuff,and,a,b);
}

but of course the above has 1 hardcoded into it, and it would ideally read something like this:

typedef params<BarObj> paramsT;
BarObj bar;
//load the first 3 params via the above info into bar

int a,b;
for (int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
{
    a = doSomethingA(bla + paramsT::paramD[i]);
    b = doSomethingB(bla + paramsT::paramE[i]);
    bla.paramD[i] = functionOf(stuff,and,a,b);
}

although for something like the above I would need the params template specialization to be something like this:

template <>
struct params<BarObj>
{
    static const int paramA   = 0;
    static const int paramB   = 9;
    static const int paramC   = 17;
    static const int paramD[] = {18, etc..};
    static const int paramE[] = {20, etc..};
};

which doesn't compile because the arrays even though hardcoded are non-integral types. Is there an easy patch around this that wouln't hopefully look too different from my current usage? Or a way to get that array stuff in there?

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Why are you using templated structs to hold hardcoded values instead of just a simple table of values? –  Kevin Ballard Dec 6 '12 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The "static implicitly inline function static local variable" hack:

template<typename T>
struct params;
struct Bob;
template<>
struct params<Bob> {
  static int paramE(unsigned int idx) {
    static const int v[] = {18, 20, 22, 24};
    return v[idx];
  }
};

#include <iostream>
int main() {
  for(auto i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
    std::cout << params<Bob>::paramE(i) << "\n";
}

note that the resulting values are not "compile time constants" (ie, cannot be used for things like template parameters), but are trivial for compilers to optimize into constants.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a cleaner solution than mine, as long as you don't mind calling a function ( () syntax ) over an index ( [] syntax ) –  Matt Dec 6 '12 at 20:06
    
This is awesome, I definitely like this. –  Palace Chan Dec 6 '12 at 20:07

You can initialize static const arrays, just not inside the class, as in this Stack Overflow question. The challenge is that you have to do the initialization exactly once per compilation unit, so it's most often done in source (.cpp) files, - therefore, it will be far away from the rest of your initialization, which is fairly gross.

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Yes I started doing this but I agree it's fairly gross. –  Palace Chan Dec 6 '12 at 20:07

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