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I've got a stored procedure that is used to process about 90,000 records to return various information; which I just join to a SQL table to filter down the records to run for (which is loaded from another process before my vb.net batch uses it). Now I need to have the exact same logic that is in the stored procedure for the 90,000 people available to run for an individual person thru a windows application. My initial thought was to use the same stored procedure (to not duplicate the logic) and just have a temp table variable that loads/uses either: --the memberID passed in (in the case of the via the windows app) or --the table with the 90,000 members (in the case the memberID is not passed in and is called from the batch). My concern is in what impact it may have on the query plan if it is being used sometimes for an individual row and then sometimes for 90,000 rows. How would performance and efficiency be affected? Is this a good idea? Or should it just be separate stored procedures with duplicated logic?

**The following is more detail about what I'm talking about. I've tried to simplify it and also had to rename everything in order to display it online.

--===========================================================================================
--The first query is getting all the members information for the batch run.
--It is joining to a tmpMembers table which is loaded with the members for the batch run 
--(filtering it down to approxiately 90,000 members for that batch run)

CREATE PROCEDURE s_GetMembersInfoSEL
AS
SELECT * --Includes a great deal of output (some of which is calculated before being returned)
FROM Members m 
INNER JOIN tmpMembers tm
  ON tm.MbrID = m.MbrID
--Also a bunch of other joins to member, claim, service, etc tables for the additional info.  

--===========================================================================================

--Proposed changes...

CREATE PROCEDURE s_GetMembersInfoSEL
                            @MbrID INT = NULL
AS
DECLARE @MbrsTable TABLE (MbrID INT  PRIMARY KEY)

IF @MbrID IS NULL
  BEGIN 
    INSERT INTO @MbrsTable          
    SELECT MbrID
    FROM tmpMembers
  END
ELSE
  BEGIN 
    INSERT INTO @MbrsTable
                (MbrID)         
    VALUES (@MbrID)
  END  

SELECT * --Includes a great deal of output (some of which is calculated before being returned)
FROM Members m 
INNER JOIN @MbrsTable tm
  ON tm.MbrID = m.MbrID
--Also a bunch of other joins to member, claim, service, etc tables for the additional info.  
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This question is really vague please add some detail such as table structures and actuall query. Having the execution plans available will also help us to helpp you. Please update this question with more details. –  Namphibian Dec 7 '12 at 6:42

1 Answer 1

The way you're using the table variable can lead to an inefficient plan being used.

From the article Query performance and table variables:

When the batch or stored procedure containing the table variable is compiled, the number of rows of the table variable is unknown. Therefore, optimizer has to make some assumptions. It estimates very low number of rows for the table variable. This can cause inefficient plan. Most of the time, a nested loop join is used with the table variable as outer table. If large number of rows exist in the table variable, this results in inner table be executed many times.

...

If you have large number of rows to be populated into the table variable, consider this solution. You can add option recompile to the statement that involves the table variable joining with other tables. By doing this, SQL Server will be able to detect number of rows at recompile because the rows have already been populated. This option is only available for SQL Server 2005 and beyond.

(Emphasis added)

Your updated query would look like:

SELECT *
FROM Members m 
INNER JOIN @MbrsTable tm
  ON tm.MbrID = m.MbrID
OPTION (RECOMPILE)

However, note that recompilation can lead to its own performance problems if the stored procedure is executed frequently enough. In this case, you might consider a different way of consolidating this logic, such as using views or user defined functions, and split these two different scenarios into separate queries and avoid using the table variable.

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Note that using a #temp table instead of a @variable table will also fix this problem. Note also that the RECOMPILE option did not work entirely right in SQL 2005 and so would not always fix this problem (this was corrected in a later version of SQL Server). –  RBarryYoung Dec 10 '12 at 18:11
    
Is the same true if using a temporary table (Create table #tbl) instead of the table variable? Could that be another option? –  user1070202 Dec 10 '12 at 18:17
    
@user1070202 Yes, like RBarryYoung suggests, a temporary table has better statistics than the temporary table... but can also cause the same recompilation as explicitly forcing it in the select statement. –  Michael Fredrickson Dec 10 '12 at 18:19

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