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Question:

Is there any way to pause javascript until after ajax has finished executing its success function?

Relevant Code:

function validateinput (name, parent, access)
{
    //we assume that the input does not exist
    exists = false;
    //validate with server, expected response is true or false
    $.post("AJAXURL", {action: "category", name: name, parent: parent}, 
    function (data, textStatus, xhr)
    {
        //if returned true, the entry does exist for that parent
        if (data == "true")
        {
            alert("AJAX");
            exists = true;
        }
        else
            exists = false;
    });

    switch (true)
    {
        //If the name field is blank (still displaying hint)
        case (name == 'Subcategory Name' || name == 'Category Name'):
            alert("Please enter a name");
            break;
        //if the name already exists for that parent
/*****/     case (exists == true):
            alert("SWITCH");
            break;
        //if the parent field is displaying hint, assume parent is blank
        case (parent == 'Parent Category'):
            parent = '';
            break;
        //if the usergroup field is blank, assume value of parent
        case (access == 'UserGroup Allowed To View'):
            //if parent is also blank, assume lowest level usergroup access
            if (parent == '')
                access = "UserGroupTicketWorkers";
            else
                    $.post("AJAXURL", {action: "specificcat", name: parent}, 
                function (data, textStatus, xhr)
                {
                    access = data['access'];
                }
                );
            break;

        default:
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Detailed Explanation Of Issue:

  • User clicks a link in page to fire this function.
  • function will return true or false whether there is an error with the user input
  • When this code executes, I receive alert("SWITCH"); BEFORE I receive alert("AJAX"); (the condition of the second case is currently correct, I inverted it in my debugging to figure out what was happening)
  • I have a temporary fix for it which is moving the second case directly before the default, but my guess is that a faster computer may execute the switch comparisons faster than the server will provide a response, and therefore not a permanent solution. (unless it doesn't work that way), and that if I put in a timer to wait for a preset amount of time, that the same issue could occur if the server is running slower than normal
  • I'm aware that I'm not getting the new value from the ajax call because there is the time spent communicating with server, so, my first thought is to find a way to pause the function until the ajax success function is completed.
  • I cannot put the switch inside the ajax call since this function needs to return a value.

Resolution

I used the async setting and it worked like a charm. Just had to change my code from $.post() to $.ajax() and set it up to post

$.ajax(
{
    url: "plugins/actions/edittickets/libs/changetickets.php", 
    type: 'POST',
    data: 
    {
        action: "category", 
        name: name, 
        parent: parent
    }, 
    async: false,
    success: function (data, textStatus, xhr)
    {
        //if returned true, the entry does exist for that parent
        if (data == "true")
            exists = true;
    }
}); 
share|improve this question
3  
It have to be inside the callback function to run after. – Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 6 '12 at 20:43
    
Or try to set async to false. – Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 6 '12 at 20:45
    
@Zeta - That is a completely valid use of switch. Using switch(true) will match the first case that evaluates to true. The problem here is the async Ajax. – nnnnnn Dec 6 '12 at 20:49
    
@Zeta actually, that's an excellent usage of switch that I often use myself. – jbabey Dec 6 '12 at 20:50
    
You should fix your code and then call that block of code within a callback function. – Mehdi Karamosly Dec 6 '12 at 20:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can send your AJAX query in a synchronous way if that's what your really want by adding 'async':false in your list of parameters.

See the documentation for more info : http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

But as other people pointed out in comments this is NOT how switch works so you still have to understand the switch statement et change the corresponding code. See here for more info : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/switch

share|improve this answer
2  
I'd recommend against this since it will lock the browser. – Ivan Dec 6 '12 at 20:46
    
The OP's code has a completely valid use of switch. (It's not the most common way of using it, but it works fine.) – nnnnnn Dec 6 '12 at 20:50
    
It is valid in the semantic sense but I don't think it is working as he expects. See this jsfiddle.net/2mzDZ it does not go in both cases, just in the first one and I don't think you can rely on the declaration order of your case as it could be optimized by the browser – koopajah Dec 6 '12 at 20:55
1  
Well certainly it won't go in more than one case, but are you sure you can't rely on the order? (If you can't rely on order then how do fall-throughs work? Or are you saying the browser might optimise it because it knows there are no fall-throughs in this instance?) – nnnnnn Dec 6 '12 at 20:57
    
Yeah that's what I mean. It could for example group cases by specific variables or by the number of comparisons to optimize for speed couldn't it? I think it's pretty risky – koopajah Dec 6 '12 at 21:00

Try to return exists instead, like the following.

function validateinput (name, parent, access)
{
    //we assume that the input does not exist
    var exists = false;
    //validate with server, expected response is true or false
    $.post("AJAXURL", {action: "category", name: name, parent: parent}, 
    function (data, textStatus, xhr)
    {
        //if returned true, the entry does exist for that parent
        if (data == "true")
        {
            alert("AJAX");
            exists = true;
        }
        else
            exists = false;

        switch (true)
        {
            //If the name field is blank (still displaying hint)
            case (name == 'Subcategory Name' || name == 'Category Name'):
                alert("Please enter a name");
                break;
            //if the name already exists for that parent
            case (exists == true):
                alert("SWITCH");
                break;
            //if the parent field is displaying hint, assume parent is blank
            case (parent == 'Parent Category'):
                parent = '';
                break;
            //if the usergroup field is blank, assume value of parent
            case (access == 'UserGroup Allowed To View'):
                //if parent is also blank, assume lowest level usergroup access
                if (parent == '')
                    access = "UserGroupTicketWorkers";
                else
                    $.post("AJAXURL", {action: "specificcat", name: parent}, 
                    function (data, textStatus, xhr) {
                        access = data['access'];
                    });
                break;

            default:
                exists = true;
        }
    });
    return exists;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you're saying to not use $.post(<CODE>); but use $.ajax({ type: 'POST', <code>, async:false); – adambullmer Dec 6 '12 at 21:02
    
Great implementation, and probably would work, but it is changing the purpose of the function. This returns if the entry exists (which the rest of the validation doesn't matter at that point) rather than returning if all of the input is valid. But it did give me an idea that it would be possible to work it that way. I previously thought that I wouldn't be able to do any of the validating inside the callback function – adambullmer Dec 6 '12 at 21:50

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