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I have been struggling with this at work today. Trying to read in an XML file like the one below (that I have quickly just typed in). I have a CSV file of show_id codes. So I read them in and put them in a hash. Then I read in the XML file using XML::Simple.

I then compare the show_id code in the element (done a loop with an array as in the online examples and then $a = $data->{Element1}->{Element2}->{show_id} and that found it) below and see if I have a match on the hash table. Bingo. I got that to work with no problem.

So let's say I match the middle two Element2 elements with show_id values of ABC11 and ABC12. Now I need to write a new file of the ones that do match. So I tried doing XMLout and I seem to lose the whole tag structure that I read in.

Is there any way to read in the data below and get rid of the records ABC10 and ABC14 for instance, and wring out the file in the same format? Let me know if that makes sense.

Also I only have XML::Simple and XML::Parser installed at work. Please HELP!!!

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<main>
  <Element1>
    <Element2>
        <show/>
        <show_id>ABC10</show_id>
        <staring>
            <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
        </staring>
    </Element2>
        <Element2>
            <show/>
            <show_id>ABC11</show_id>
            <staring>
                <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
            </staring>
    </Element2>
        <Element2>
            <show/>
            <show_id>ABC12</show_id>
            <staring>
                <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
            </staring>
    </Element2>
        <Element2>
            <show/>
            <show_id>ABC14</show_id>
            <staring>
                <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
            </staring>
    </Element2>
  </Element1>
</main>
share|improve this question
    
You will not be able to achieve this with only XML::Simple. It is possible to write a program for this using XML::Parser, but that is a low-level module intended mainly as a base class. Are you really restricted to only these tools? –  Borodin Dec 6 '12 at 23:37

3 Answers 3

If you able to get XML::Twig installed, this is a solution you may prefer.

use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::Twig;

my %keep = (
  ABC11 => 1,
  ABC12 => 1,
);

my $twig = XML::Twig->new(
  keep_spaces => 1,
  twig_handlers => { Element2 => \&Element2 }
);  

$twig->parsefile('data.xml');
$twig->print;

sub Element2 {
  my ($twig, $elem) = @_;
  my $show_id = $elem->first_child_text('show_id');
  $elem->delete unless $keep{$show_id};
}

or if you prefer XML::LibXML then this will work

use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::LibXML;

my %keep = (
  ABC11 => 1,
  ABC12 => 1,
);

my $xml = XML::LibXML->load_xml(location => 'data.xml');

for my $elem2 ($xml->findnodes('//Element2')) {
  my $show_id = $elem2->find('show_id');
  $elem2->parentNode->removeChild($elem2) unless $keep{$show_id};
}

print $xml->toString;

The output of these programs is identical.

output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<main>
  <Element1>

        <Element2>
            <show/>
            <show_id>ABC11</show_id>
            <staring>
                <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
            </staring>
    </Element2>
        <Element2>
            <show/>
            <show_id>ABC12</show_id>
            <staring>
                <show_header>This is a test</show_header>
            </staring>
    </Element2>

  </Element1>
</main>
share|improve this answer

First, get rid of disused elements:

$data->{Element1}{Element2} = [
  grep { $_->{show_id} =~ /^ABC1[12]$/ } @{$data->{Element1}{Element2}}
];

And then, writing out in XML format. (With NoAttr => 1, hashes are represented as nested elements instead of attributes.)

print XMLout($data, NoAttr => 1, RootName => "main");

You can pass KeepRoot => 1 to XMLin and XMLout to handle root element ("main") instead of RootName => 1. If you do so, use $data->{main}{Element1}{Element2}.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. But I need the same format that comes in as goes out. Also I do not know what elements I will be getting rid off until I run the script and read in the exclusion file. My origanl script worked up to a point but the output XML file did not match the format of the input one when I displaed the results in Explorer. I did try NoAttr => 1 and it formatted it a lot better. But some tags were repeated. –  henryl Dec 6 '12 at 21:40

If you want the same thing going out as coming in, don't use XML::Simple. Here's a solution using XML::Rules:

use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::Rules;

my @keep_these = qw(
  ABC11
  ABC12
);
my %keep; $keep{$_}++ for @keep_these;

my @rules = (
  Element2 => sub {
    my $id = $_[1]->{show_id}{_content};
    return unless $keep{$id};
    return $_[0] => $_[1];
  },
);
my $p = XML::Rules->new(
  style => 'filter',
  rules => \@rules,
  stripspaces => 3,
);

$p->filter(\*DATA, \*STDOUT);

__END__
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<main>
  <Element1>
    <Element2>
etc.
share|improve this answer
    
Hi. So if I read in my codes to keep and put them in an array as per @keep_these I understand. WIll try out the code and see what happens. Would the above code get rid of the whole element (as in fro the start to the end of the tag) where a code read in is not matched? –  henryl Dec 6 '12 at 21:45
    
PS... How can I use the above if I have my data in a file called data.xml for example please? Thanks again –  henryl Dec 6 '12 at 22:00
    
Thanks... Got it going... –  henryl Dec 6 '12 at 23:29

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