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How can you use optional parameters in C#?

I am making text adventure, and using some code I found online, I have typewriter style printing. So I have this code in a function and besides passing in the code to type, I am also trying to pass in the delay between types. Now my problem is that I don't always want to have to put in the argument for the delay, I tried searching the default value of a int variable and seeing if making a if statement check if the variable was not its default and if it wasn't the default it would use what was passed in. Except it still won't work, it still wants me to pass in something. Is their anyway to get this to work?

Sorry if my question is confusing, I'm not the best at making non-confusing sentences... (see?)

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marked as duplicate by Metro Smurf, Frank van Puffelen, clintp, Steve, Mario Dec 6 '12 at 21:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
So what should it do if no value is supplied? Do you know of a value that makes sense to use, do you want to do something else entirely if no value is supplied? –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 21:13
4  
If you find it hard to express your code in words, it would be better to include it as code... –  Jon Skeet Dec 6 '12 at 21:13
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use Optional Arguments:

public void MovePerson(int x, int y, int delay = 300) 
{

}

Here, in this completely made up funciton, you can build in a default delay that will be set to 300 if you don't specify a value when calling the function.

MovePerson(10, 20);  //Delay for 300
MovePerson(10, 20, 100); //Delay for 100
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Thanks, this helps a lot! I didn't think it would be this simple... –  Matrixian Dec 6 '12 at 21:45
    
No problem, I'm glad I could help. –  Robert Greiner Dec 6 '12 at 23:41
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public void Task (String optional = "default") {
   ...
}
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1  
and in the case of his example, int delay = 0 or int? delay = null if you want a nullable int (in situations that 0 is different than null) –  Eli Gassert Dec 6 '12 at 21:14
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Just use default parameters

int Multiply (int a = 10, int b = 20)
{
    return a * b;
}

Or you can also overload a function

int Multiply ()
{
    return 10 * 20;
}
int Multiply (int a, int b)
{
    return a * b;
}
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The traditional method of addressing this issue is to have multiple method overloads. Here is one example:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar(string value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(value);
    }

    public void Bar()
    {
        Bar("I have no value :(");
    }
}

You can call Bar("hello world") or just Bar() and it will use a default value.

C# has since introduced syntactic sugar to make this easier, since it's such a common patter, by using optional arguments:

public void Bar(string value = "I have no value :(")
{
    Console.WriteLine(value);
}

This will end up working in (approximately) the same way, but is much easier to type.

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