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How can I make permutations of 2 letters with a prefix word?

like this:

NAMEaa NAMEab NAMEac NAMEad NAMEae NAMEaf ... ...

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closed as not constructive by L.B, Yuriy Faktorovich, Steve, Bo Persson, Jefffrey Dec 6 '12 at 22:00

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Can't you simply make all permutation of two letters and prepend "NAME"? –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Dec 6 '12 at 21:29
    
All letters including arabic, chinese etc....? –  L.B Dec 6 '12 at 21:31
    
@L.B. don't forget Klingon. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Dec 6 '12 at 21:33
    
letters from a to z –  Mario M Dec 6 '12 at 21:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can easily get desired result with LINQ:

string prefix = "NAME";
string alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

IEnumerable<string> words = from x in alphabet
                            from y in alphabet
                            select prefix + x + y;
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for (char c1 = 'a'; c1 <= 'z'; c1++)
{
    for (char c2 = 'a'; c2 <= 'z'; c2++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("NAME" + c1 + c2);
    }
}

BTW, those are not permutations.

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It's permutations with repetition (as opposed to permutations without repetition) but that's still a type of permutation. –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 21:41

Create an array with all alphabet and loop over it's indices twice.

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That's not permutations, that is combinations.

Put the characters that you want in a string:

string chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

The number of possible combinations is:

int combinations = chars.Length * chars.Length;

To get a specific combination (0 to combinations-1):

string str =
  "NAME" +
  chars.Substring(combination / chars.Length, 1) +
  chars.Substring(combination % chars.Length, 1);

To get all combinations you simply loop through them:

string chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
int combinations = chars.Length * chars.Length;
List<string> result = new List<string>();
for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++) {
  result.Add(
    "NAME" +
    chars.Substring(combination / chars.Length, 1) +
    chars.Substring(combination % chars.Length, 1);
  );
}
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Given the example he gave, he did not continue the sequence for long enough to determine if it was combinations or permutations (they start out identical), and since he said permutations, it's logical to assume that's what he wants (with no evidence to the contrary). Also note that you have implemented a solution that returns permutations, not combinations, so I guess you just mixed the two up ;) –  Servy Dec 6 '12 at 21:37
    
@Servy: No, sorry, but you are completely of the mark there. Permutations is rearranging, so the possible permutations of two characters, for example a and b is ab and ba. This isn't strictly combinations (as that would not contain repeated characters), but it's a lot closer to that than to permutations. –  Guffa Dec 6 '12 at 21:53

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