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Right now, I have something like this...

CMD console window: c:\users\username\Desktop> wrapfile.txt hello.txt

Hello

How would I get something like this?

CMD console window: c:\users\username\Desktop> wrapfile.txt hello.txt hi.txt

Hello Hi

with this code?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc[1], char *argv[1])
{
    FILE *fp; // declaring variable 
    fp = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    if (fp != NULL) // checks the return value from fopen
    {
        int i;
        do
        {
            i = fgetc(fp);     // scans the file 
            printf("%c",i);
            printf(" ");
        }
        while(i!=-1);
        fclose(fp);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Error.\n");
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You asked a very similar question before, and were given the information about how to solve this one (remember argc and argv[]?). Are you even reading the answers you're getting, or are you just copying and pasting the code? (And your definition of main(argc[1], argv[1]) is wrong; argc and argv[] are passed in to you, with argc containing the number of items you'll find in argv[]; you don't declare them with pre-defined sizes - you'd know that if you read the answers you got). – Ken White Dec 6 '12 at 21:41
    
I'm reading them, but Ken, I'm new to C and I'm trying to learn. I don't copy and paste the code, I read it over and if I understand it, I write a similar code that works, if I don't, I google it and see how it works. – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 21:42
    
The argc and argv[] were both mentioned (first by me in a comment, and then in the answer you accepted). Both of them mention what argc and argv[] are and how they're used, but you ignored it in this question posted less than a day later. The accepted answer even demonstrates how to use the argv[] array by retrieving the first element from it. – Ken White Dec 6 '12 at 21:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, first of all: in your main declaration, you should use int main(int argc, char* argv[]) instead of what you have right now. Specifying an array size makes no sense when declaring an extern variable (that's what argv and argc are). On the top of that, you are not using the correct types. argc is integer and argv is array of strings (which are arrays of chars). So argv is an array of arrays of chars.

Then, simply use the argc counter to loop through the argv array. argv[0] is the name of the program, and argv[1] to argv[n] will be the arguments you pass to your program while executing it.

Here is a good explanation on how this works: http://www.physics.drexel.edu/courses/Comp_Phys/General/C_basics/#command-line

My 2 cents.


EDIT: Here is a commented version of the working program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FILE *fp;
    char c;
    if(argc < 3)    // Check that you can safely access to argv[0], argv[1] and argv[2].
    {               // If not, (i.e. if argc is 1 or 2), print usage on stderr.
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <file> <file>\n", argv[0]);
        return 1;   // Then exit.
    }

    fp = fopen(argv[1], "rb");   // Open the first file.
    if (fp == NULL)   // Check for errors.
    {
        printf("Error: cannot open file %s\n", argv[1]);
        return 1;
    }

    do   // Read it.
    {
        c = fgetc(fp); // scans the file
        if(c != -1)
            printf("%c", c);
    } while(c != -1);
    fclose(fp);   // Close it.

    fp = fopen(argv[2], "rb");   // Open the second file.
    if (fp == NULL)   // Check for errors.
    {
        printf("Error: cannot open file %s\n", argv[2]);
        return 1;
    }

    do   // Read it.
    {
        c = fgetc(fp); // scans the file
        if(c != -1)
            printf("%c", c);
    } while(c!=-1);
    fclose(fp);   // Close it.

    return 0;       // You use int main and not void main, so you MUST return a value.
}

I hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I did read over it, and it did help me understand what I'm doing, but it doesn't help me understand why my program keeps crashing lol pastebin.com/L0RqjYYM – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 22:50
    
Yup, thanks a bunch :) – James Heartly Dec 7 '12 at 0:08
    
If you have more than two files to read, since the operations to do are repetitive, and the data structures (file descriptor, and else) are re-usable, you can put the file opening and reading (and closing) in a loop structure (for, or while). – 7heo.tk Dec 7 '12 at 11:47

argv[2] would be the second file name.

Do not forget to check the value of argc to see if enough arguments are valid.

Better: use boost::program_options.

Caution: this code is not unicode-aware on Windows system, which makes it not portable. Refer to utf8everywhere.org about how to make it support all file names on this platform.

share|improve this answer
    
And if I wanted more then two .txt files, how would that work? I know your answer works, and thank you, but if I wanted to have an unlimited number of text files, would that be possible as well? – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 21:44
    
yes. argv[as big natural number as you like]. Still, do not write like this. Submarine onion peeling is a punishment for unicode-broken code. – Pavel Radzivilovsky Dec 6 '12 at 21:45
    
lol alright. I'll do some research on the argc and argv commands in C. I'll go from there, thanks again :) – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 21:47
    
Hey Pavel, I had a quick question. I tried changing the argv values to 3 (assuming it would accept 3 text files) and it crashed on me. I changed both argv values to 3, so it would look like this: int main(int argc[1], char *argv[3]) and fp = fopen(argv[3], "rb"); – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 22:01
    
any ideas on what's wrong? – James Heartly Dec 6 '12 at 22:01

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