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I have the following code that parses HTML text and trims (or strips) the paragraphs that are empty. It's similar to .strip on a String object.

doc = Nokogiri::HTML::DocumentFragment.parse(html)

# repetition that I want to collapse
doc.css('p').each do |p|
  if all_children_are_blank?(p)
    p.remove
  else
    break
  end
end

# repetition that I want to collapse
doc.css('p').reverse_each do |p|
  if all_children_are_blank?(p)
    p.remove
  else
    break
  end
end

doc.to_s.strip

Is there a more elegant way to prevent code that I've labelled with comments to be duplicated and adhere to principles of code-reuse?

Here is what I've come up with but I'm not happy with it yet and wanted to see if there is something better:

doc = Nokogiri::HTML::DocumentFragment.parse(html)

doc.css('p').each do |p|
  if stop(p) then break end
end

doc.css('p').reverse_each do |p|
  if stop(p) then break end
end

doc.to_s.strip

def self.stop(p)
  if all_children_are_blank?(p)
    p.remove
    false
  else
    true
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
What I'm looking for is something like doc.css('p')(.each and .reverse_each) do |p| –  Hengjie Dec 6 '12 at 22:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand what you're looking for, you would like a simpler way to iterate over the elements you're looking at, in order to remove blank p elements.

Here is a straightforward way to collapse what you've written, without doing a whole lot different:

doc.tap do |d|
  [:each, :reverse_each].each do |sym|
    d.css("p").public_send(sym) do |p|
      if blank_children?(p)
        p.remove
      else
        break
      end
    end
  end
end.to_s.strip

I have not tested this out, so you might need to tweak it a little. If this were production code, I would probably decompose it into one or more method calls in order to keep things clear.

share|improve this answer

Maybe something like:

puts "removing a top p" until stop(doc.at('p'))
puts "removing a bottom p" until stop(doc.search('p').last)

or just:

puts "removing a p" until stop(doc.at('p')) && stop(doc.search('p').last)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. I've replaced it with true until stop(doc.css('p').first) and stop(doc.css('p').last) but with this should I be concerned with addition cycles being used due to doc.css('p') being constantly executed in the loop. If so, is there a way to mitigate it. –  Hengjie Dec 7 '12 at 9:45
    
There's a possible performance impact, but nokogiri is very fast. For me, I wouldn't worry about it. In any case, the question asked for an elegant solution, not a performant one. –  pguardiario Dec 7 '12 at 10:16

How about:

[*doc.css('p'), *doc.css('p').reverse].each do |p|
  if stop(p) then break end
end

In this case, the splat operator ("*") expands both lists into one array, with the elements in ascending, then descending order. Then you just iterate over the whole group.


Edit: This won't work properly because of the break statement skipping to the end of everything. So the proper way of doing this, IMHO, would be to assign the block to a variable. And you might as well eliminate the stop function since you are eliminating the duplication of code anyway:

remover = lambda do |p|
  if all_children_are_blank? p
    p.remove
  else
    break
  end
end

doc.css('p').to_a.each(&remover).reverse_each(&remover)

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
to be clear, the splat operator works like this: `[*[1,2,3], *%w[a b c]] ==> [1, 2, 3, "a", "b", "c"] –  Mark Hubbart Dec 6 '12 at 23:30
    
Thanks, this is interesting and I didn't know you could merge the two arrays together like this. I think my only problem with this approach is that the break is there to stop trimming from the beginning and to move onto trimming from the end. As this combines it, the trim breaks and doesn't continue from the end. Is there a way around this? –  Hengjie Dec 7 '12 at 9:13
    
Note: the ordering is important as I don't want to remove p in the middle, only at the end. –  Hengjie Dec 7 '12 at 9:47
    
That's kind of cool. –  Eric Walker Dec 7 '12 at 18:20

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