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I am scratching my head with a strange problem highlighted by the following minimal code:

struct A {
    template <typename ...X, typename ...Y>
    void f(X... a, Y...b) {
    }

    template <typename ...X>
    void g(X...c) {
       f<X...> (c...);
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct B {
    template <typename ...X, typename ...Y>
    void f(X... a, Y...b) {
    }

    template <typename ...X>
    void g(X...c) {
       f<X...> (c...);
    }
};



int main() {
    A a;
    a.g(); // Compiles without problem

    B<int> b;
    b.g(); // Compiler complains saying g() calls f<>() with 0 arguments while 1 is expected
}

Both g++ and clang++ give the same basic error messages for the second case. They basically say that the call to f() within the templated class needs one argument.

Is this a bug in both compilers, or am I missing something in the C++ standard?

share|improve this question
    
clang from trunk also borks on the first version. –  pmr Dec 6 '12 at 22:17
    
Interesting. So is such a method or function illegal in the standard? –  Michel Dec 6 '12 at 22:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The method taking two parameter packs is illegal according to 14.1 [temp.param] paragraph 11:

... A template parameter pack of a function template shall not be followed by another template parameter unless that template parameter can be deduced from the parameter-type-list of the function template or has a default argument (14.8.2). [ Example:

template<class T1 = int, class T2> class B; // error
// U cannot be neither deduced from the parameter-type-list nor specified
template<class... T, class... U> void f() { } // error
template<class... T, class U> void g() { } // error

—end example ]

share|improve this answer
    
The diagnostics I have seen so far from clang and gcc are outright wrong. It seems reasonable that this is not allowed. –  pmr Dec 6 '12 at 22:28
    
@pmr: Yeah, it's strange that Clang has such weird note:s attached to the errors, and that it compiles the code at all when f isn't called. –  Xeo Dec 6 '12 at 22:31
    
The example you show is understandable but if U is passed, it can be deduced so it should be legal in such a case. But I can see that my example is asking for trouble. It sounds like the compiler should also complain about the case for struct A. –  Michel Dec 6 '12 at 22:31
    
@Michel: How can you ever pass U? All arguments will be swallowed by T (and X and a in the question's code). –  Xeo Dec 6 '12 at 22:31
1  
@Xeo: template <class ... T, class U...> void f(U...) {} // unambiguous U from the list of arguments From what Dietmar wrote, it should be legal "unless that template parameter can be deduced from the parapeter-type-list of the function template –  Michel Dec 6 '12 at 22:33

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