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I'd like to create an array from a CSV file.

This is about as simple as you can imagine, the CSV file will only ever have one line and these values:

Device, SignalStrength, Location, Time, Age.

I'd like to put these values into one dimensional array.

I've tried some examples but they've all been more complicated than required.

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smells a little homeworky - show us what you have so far –  annakata Sep 3 '09 at 19:26
    
The "into one dimensional array" sounds strange, are you sure you want to loose the line–breaks information? –  Henk Holterman Sep 3 '09 at 19:47
    
@HenkHolterman the OP states there will only ever be one line –  KingCronus Apr 25 '12 at 9:22
    
@KingCronus we are in 2012, the question has an accepted answer, why bother? –  Adrian Iftode Apr 25 '12 at 9:26
    
@AdrianIftode, I noticed the question because of the new answer (bottom) putting it into the c# active list. I didn't dredge this one up, they did. –  KingCronus Apr 25 '12 at 11:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 45 down vote accepted

If there is only ever one line then do something like this:

using System;
using System.IO;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    	String[] values = File.ReadAllText(@"d:\test.csv").Split(',');
    }
}
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57  
No, no, no this is way too complex!! –  ChaosPandion Jan 28 '10 at 6:21
80  
If a any of the fields contain a comma, this will fail. –  pate Jun 22 '12 at 0:12
2  
How do you deal with new lines? –  nonsensickle Jan 13 '14 at 2:52
13  
@jamesdeath123 CSV column values can contain commas, so long as they are wrapped in double quotes, e.g. "this is, a test". –  pate Jan 25 '14 at 9:37
3  
This answer is wrong and should not be the accepted answer since it will not handle anything but the most basic csv files, and most systems that can create CSV will be able to create files that this solution would fail to load. Among them the type of files I am looking for a solution for. –  David Mårtensson Mar 11 at 15:18

You can try the some thing like the below LINQ snippet.

string[] allLines = File.ReadAllLines(@"E:\Temp\data.csv");

    var query = from line in allLines
                let data = line.Split(',')
                select new
                {
                    Device = data[0],
                    SignalStrength = data[1],
                    Location = data[2], 
                    Time = data[3],
                    Age = Convert.ToInt16(data[4])
                };

UPDATE: Over a period of time, things evolved. As of now, I would prefer to use this library http://www.aspnetperformance.com/post/LINQ-to-CSV-library.aspx

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6  
Hi Ramesh.. your solution is great.. but how do you escape the commas?? –  andrew0007 Apr 11 '11 at 14:58
    
@andrew007 - First thing which came to my mind is to use regex to split. check out regexadvice.com/blogs/wayneking/archive/2004/01/12/271.aspx –  Ramesh Apr 14 '11 at 15:22
8  
@ramesh "Some people, when confronted with a problem, think 'I know, I'll use regular expressions.' Now they have two problems." - Jamie Zawinski. Have a look at secretgeek.net/csv_trouble.asp. –  David Keaveny Dec 9 '11 at 4:00
    
LINQ-to-CSV is definitely the way to go. So simple to use! –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 7 '13 at 7:14

Here's a simple function I made. It accepts a string CSV line and returns an array of fields:

It works well with Excel generated CSV files, and many other variations.

    public static string[] ParseCsvRow(string r)
    {

        string[] c;
        string t;
        List<string> resp = new List<string>();
        bool cont = false;
        string cs = "";

        c = r.Split(new char[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.None);

        foreach (string y in c)
        {
            string x = y;


            if (cont)
            {
                // End of field
                if (x.EndsWith("\""))
                {
                    cs += "," + x.Substring(0, x.Length - 1);
                    resp.Add(cs);
                    cs = "";
                    cont = false;
                    continue;

                }
                else
                {
                    // Field still not ended
                    cs += "," + x;
                    continue;
                }
            }

            // Fully encapsulated with no comma within
            if (x.StartsWith("\"") && x.EndsWith("\""))
            {
                if ((x.EndsWith("\"\"") && !x.EndsWith("\"\"\"")) && x != "\"\"")
                {
                    cont = true;
                    cs = x;
                    continue;
                }

                resp.Add(x.Substring(1, x.Length - 2));
                continue;
            }

            // Start of encapsulation but comma has split it into at least next field
            if (x.StartsWith("\"") && !x.EndsWith("\""))
            {
                cont = true;
                cs += x.Substring(1);
                continue;
            }

            // Non encapsulated complete field
            resp.Add(x);

        }

        return resp.ToArray();

    }
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1  
this fails when you have cell1, "cell2", ",,,,,,,,", "previous fails" –  MurWade Mar 13 at 3:37

This is what I used in a project, parses a single line of data.

    private string[] csvParser(string csv, char separator = ',')
    {
        List <string> = new <string>();
        string[] temp = csv.Split(separator);
        int counter = 0;
        string data = string.Empty;
        while (counter < temp.Length)
        {
            data = temp[counter].Trim();
            if (data.Trim().StartsWith("\""))
            {
                bool isLast = false;
                while (!isLast && counter < temp.Length)
                {
                    data += separator.ToString() + temp[counter + 1];
                    counter++;
                    isLast = (temp[counter].Trim().EndsWith("\""));
                }
            }
            parsed.Add(data);
            counter++;
        }

        return parsed.ToArray();

    }

http://zamirsblog.blogspot.com/2013/09/c-csv-parser-csvparser.html

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I think line 3 should read: List<string> parsed = new List<string>(); –  Matiaan Apr 20 at 11:16

My solution handles quotes, overriding field and string separators, etc. It is short and sweet.

    public static string[] CSVRowToStringArray(string r, char fieldSep = ',', char stringSep = '\"')
    {
        bool bolQuote = false;
        StringBuilder bld = new StringBuilder();
        List<string> retAry = new List<string>();

        foreach (char c in r.ToCharArray())
            if ((c == fieldSep && !bolQuote))
            {
                retAry.Add(bld.ToString());
                bld.Clear();
            }
            else
                if (c == stringSep)
                    bolQuote = !bolQuote;
                else
                    bld.Append(c);

        return retAry.ToArray();
    }
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